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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Rocky Mount in Nash County, North Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Lafayette

 
 
Lafayette Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 2011
1. Lafayette Marker
Inscription. On his American tour, Lafayette spent the night of February 28, 1825, at the home of Henry Donaldson which stood near this spot.
 
Erected 1941 by North Carolina Office of Archives & History. (Marker Number E-31.)
 
Location. 35° 57.687′ N, 77° 48.318′ W. Marker is in Rocky Mount, North Carolina, in Nash County. Marker is on Falls Road (State Highway 43/48) near Peachtree Street, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Located on northern bank at Tar River bridge. Marker is in this post office area: Rocky Mount NC 27804, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Donaldson's Tavern (within shouting distance of this marker); Falls Road Bridge (within shouting distance of this marker); "The Bethel Heroes" (within shouting distance of this marker); First Post Office of Rocky Mount (about 600 feet away, measured in a direct line); Rocky Mount Mills (approx. 0.2 miles away); Rocky Mount Mills School (approx. 0.3 miles away); Falls of the Tar Church (approx. 0.3 miles away); P.T. Barnum (approx. 0.9 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Rocky Mount.
 
Regarding Lafayette. The Marquis de Lafayette, a Frenchman who served as
Lafayette Marker, looking north along Falls Road (NC 43/48) image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, July 18, 2011
2. Lafayette Marker, looking north along Falls Road (NC 43/48)
a Major General in the Continental Army and was a close friend of George Washington, was invited by Congress to visit the United States as the guest of the nation. His visit, during the years 1824 and 1825, remains an unparalleled American journey. Lafayette arrived in New York in August 1824 and, over the next six months, toured New England and the middle states before traveling further south in February 1825.

Lafayette’s first overnight stop in North Carolina was at Murfreesboro on February 26, 1825. On the morning of the 27th, he left Murfreesboro at about 11:00 A.M. and traveled about twenty miles to Northampton Court House (now the town of Jackson), where he was received by the official state welcoming committee. Lafayette and his entourage moved on to Halifax, where he gave an impassioned speech about liberty and freedom, dined in the Eagle Tavern, and stayed for the evening of February 27-28.

After the stop in Halifax, Lafayette continued on to Raleigh, where he was guest of Governor Hutchins G. Burton. Numerous balls and festivities were held in his honor, and Raleigh’s social elite surrounded him. He was entertained in the home of Revolutionary War veteran William Polk. Afterwards the procession continued on to Fayetteville where the largest celebration in his honor was held. Formerly the town of Cross Creek, Fayetteville had been named in Lafayette’s
Lafayette Marker, Falls Road on left and Peachtree Street (southbound) at right image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, July 18, 2011
3. Lafayette Marker, Falls Road on left and Peachtree Street (southbound) at right
honor in 1783.(North Carolina Office of Archives & History)
 
Categories. Notable Persons
 
General the Marquis de Lafayette image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, September 5, 2015
4. General the Marquis de Lafayette
This portrait of Lafayette by an unknown American Artist hangs in the Museum of the Historical Society of Maryland in Baltimore.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on August 16, 2011, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 320 times since then and 21 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on August 16, 2011, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   4. submitted on November 7, 2015, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.
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