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The National Mall in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Enid A. Haupt Garden

 
 
Enid A. Haupt Garden Marker Panel 1 image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, August 21, 2011
1. Enid A. Haupt Garden Marker Panel 1
Inscription.
Panel 1:
Enid A. Haupt Garden. A popular urban oasis since its completion in 1987, the 4.2-acre Enid A. Haupt Garden comprises three distinct gardens. The design of each reflects the cultural and aesthetic influences celebrated in the Smithsonian Castle and the surrounding museums. The Moongate Garden (1) next to the Arthur M. Sackler Gallery, draws design inspiration from the Temple of Heaven, a 15th century religious complex in China. The Victorian–style Parterre (2) extends the Castle’s grand welcome through and expansive lawn and formal plantings. The Fountain Garden (3) located beside the National Museum of African Art, was modeled after the Alhambra, a 14th Century Moorish palace and fortress in Spain.

The landscape design was a collaborative effort of Jean Paul Carlhian, FAIA, of Shepley Bulfinch Richardson and Abbott; Sasaki Associates, Inc.; and Lester Collins, FASLA.

[Map highlighting the Moongate Garden, the Parterre, the Fountain Garden and the Smithsonian facilities between the “Castle” and Independence Avenue]

Panel 2:
The Parterre. Parterres – from the French term meaning “on or along the ground” – originated in 16th century Renaissance Italy as an ornamental garden style. The style, which defines
Enid A. Haupt Garden Marker Panel 2 image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, August 21, 2011
2. Enid A. Haupt Garden Marker Panel 2
garden space by arranging hedges, flowers, grass, water, and gravel to form a pleasing pattern, was adapted in France in the 1580s and became exceedingly popular. Parterres fell out of favor in the 18th century during a shift to more naturalistic designs.
During the Victorian era, parterres enjoyed an exuberant revival in the United States. The Sunken Garden at the 1876 Centennial Exposition in Philadelphia featured a parterre whose design later inspired the Smithsonian Castle’s original parterre. Created for America’s Bicentennial, that parterre was removed in the 1980s for the construction of the underground museum complex and rebuilt as the centerpiece of the Enid A. Haupt Garden.

Photograph: "Sunken Garden, Fairmount Park, Philadelphia, PA., 1876"
* Keystone View Co., B.L. Singley, 1898 (Smithsonian Institution, Horticulture Services Division, Archives of American Gardens)
For more information about the Smithsonian gardens, visit www.gardens.si.edu
 
Erected by the Smithsonian Institution.
 
Location. 38° 53.276′ N, 77° 1.559′ W. Marker is in The National Mall, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker can be reached from the intersection of Independence Avenue, SW and 10th Street, NW. Touch for map.
The Enid A. Haupt Garden with the Smithsonian "Castle" behind the parterre image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, August 21, 2011
3. The Enid A. Haupt Garden with the Smithsonian "Castle" behind the parterre
- viewed from the Renwick Gates off Indpendence Avenue.
Marker is at or near this postal address: 1000 Jefferson Drive, SW, Washington DC 20560, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Spencer Fullerton Baird (within shouting distance of this marker); Andrew Jackson Downing (within shouting distance of this marker); Original Smithsonian Institution Building (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Joseph Henry (about 400 feet away); Arts and Industries Building (about 500 feet away); Carousel on the Mall, Washington, D.C. (about 600 feet away); Earth Day Park (about 600 feet away); Federal Grain Inspection Service (about 700 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in The National Mall.
 
Related marker. Click here for another marker that is related to this marker. To better understand the relationship, study each marker in the order shown.
 
Also see . . .  Enid A. Haupt dies at 99 - Philanthropist Donated Millions for Green Spaces. (Submitted on August 26, 2011, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.)
 
Additional keywords. Enid Annenberg Haupt.
 
Categories. Horticulture & ForestryNotable PersonsNotable Places
 
The Smithsonian Buffalo - before the parterre image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, August 21, 2011
4. The Smithsonian Buffalo - before the parterre
Acquired in 1886 by the Department of Living Animals, buffalo [American bison] were penned behind the Smithsonian Castle before being moved to what is now the National Zoological Park. Their presence sparked public interest in the preservation of a vanishing American species.
(Smithsonian Institution Archives)
Enid A. Haupt image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, August 21, 2011
5. Enid A. Haupt
“Nature is my religion” – Enid A. Haupt.
Philanthropist and publishing heiress Enid Annenberg Haupt (1906-2005) donated millions of dollars to support public gardens, horticultural institutions, and other green spaces in Washington, D.C., New York, and around the world.
(Smithsonian Institution, Horticulture Services Division, Archives of American Gardens)
Enid A. Haupt Garden image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, August 21, 2011
6. Enid A. Haupt Garden
Built above an underground museum complex, the Haupt Garden is actually a rooftop garden. As such, the limited soil depth and protection provided by the surrounding museums provide a climate milder than is typical of the region.
(Shepley, Bulfinch, Richardson and Abbott)
Enid A. Haupt Garden: Renwick Gates image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, August 27, 2011
7. Enid A. Haupt Garden: Renwick Gates
The pillars of the Renwick Gates were based on this 1849 drawing by James Renwick, Jr. the architect of the Smithsonian Castle. They were constructed in the 1980s from the same kind of sandstone that was used to build the Castle.
(Smithsonian Institution Libraries)
Enid A. Haupt Garden: Renwick Gates image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, August 27, 2011
8. Enid A. Haupt Garden: Renwick Gates
The Moongate Garden image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, August 21, 2011
9. The Moongate Garden
The Fountain Garden image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, August 21, 2011
10. The Fountain Garden
The Moongate Garden - near the Arthur M. Sackler Gallery image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, August 21, 2011
11. The Moongate Garden - near the Arthur M. Sackler Gallery
The Fountain Garden - near the National Museum of African Art image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, August 21, 2011
12. The Fountain Garden - near the National Museum of African Art
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on March 4, 2017. This page originally submitted on August 26, 2011, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. This page has been viewed 758 times since then and 36 times this year. Last updated on August 30, 2011, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on August 26, 2011, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.   7, 8, 9, 10. submitted on August 27, 2011, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.   11, 12. submitted on August 28, 2011, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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