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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Paducah in McCracken County, Kentucky — The American South (East South Central)
 

MAQS

 
 
MAQS Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Stroud, June 1991
1. MAQS Marker
Inscription. Museum of the American Quilters Society opened April 25, 1991. Meredith and Bill Schroeder dedicated this facility to promote, preserve and perpetuate quilting. Paducah, Kentucky, home of the American Quilters Society, is visited by thousands of quilters annually. Mayor Gerry B. Montgomery has proclaimed this city Quilt City USA.
 
Erected 1991 by Paducah Hospitality Association.
 
Location. 37° 5.324′ N, 88° 35.857′ W. Marker is in Paducah, Kentucky, in McCracken County. Marker is on N. 3rd St (Business U.S. 60) near Jefferson Street, on the left when traveling east. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 215 Jefferson St, Paducah KY 42001, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Col. Hick's Hdqrs. (within shouting distance of this marker); On the Trail of Discovery (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Lewis and Clark in Kentucky (about 400 feet away); Irvin S. Cobb Said: / Alben W. Barkley Said: (about 600 feet away); Dr. Reuben Saunders (about 600 feet away); Hanks Bros and Jones Hardware
The Museum of the American Quilter Society and Marker image. Click for full size.
June 22, 2006
2. The Museum of the American Quilter Society and Marker
(about 600 feet away); $5 Bought Paducah (about 700 feet away); American Red Cross (about 700 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Paducah.
 
Regarding MAQS. Out of a desire to share, the museum is dedicated to quilts, quilt makers and quilting.
 
Also see . . .
1. The Museum of the American Quilters Society Homepage. Official MAQS website with information on their quality professional exhibits of new and antique quilts and related archival materials. (Submitted on January 18, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 

2. Quilting Pathways. Past pictures From Quilt City USA (Submitted on January 18, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 

3. An Insight Interview with Erik Reid, Assistant Curator of MAQS. Written by Pat Middleton in 1995 and published Discover! America's Great River Road.
"The Museum was built here in 1991 mainly because Meredith and Bill Schroeder, the founders of the American Quilter's Society, live in Paducah." (Submitted on January 18, 2008, by Kevin W. of Stafford, Virginia.) 
 
Additional comments.
Honoring Today's Quilter image. Click for full size.
June 22, 2006
3. Honoring Today's Quilter
1. Bill and Meredith Schroeder and The Museum of the American Quilter’s Society

In the 1960s while working full time at a chemical company in Calvert City, Kentucky, Bill Schroeder spent his spare time buying and selling rare coins, silver, gold, limited edition prints, and other collectibles that were popular at the time. When the coin market weakened in 1964, he sold his coin business and focused his attention on old canning jars. In order to buy and sell these jars, he placed ads in the classified sections of various farm publications. These ads simply stated, “We buy & sell old fruit jars. Send $1.00 for complete list. Refundable on first transaction. Schroeder’s, Rt. 4, Paducah, KY.”

Bill found out early on that these homemakers weren’t interested in buying jars or even selling the jars that had been passed down for generations. They were interested, however, in knowing the value of these heirlooms. In 1969, Bill began to compile a small booklet entitled “1,000 Fruit Jars with Current Values,” an easy-to-use guide that contained rather crude line drawings found on the sides of the jars. The booklet contained information relative to size, color, variation, closures, and of course, value.

Fast forward to 1974 and it was apparent that Bill Schroeder, and wife Meredith, had found a niche that Schroeder Publishing filled and that
Quilt Museum image. Click for full size.
June 22, 2006
4. Quilt Museum
following this dream required their full-time devotion to the company. Bill resigned his day job and a division of the company called Collector Books was formed.

Out of their efforts the “Schroeder’s Antiques Price Guide,” published annually by Collector Books, became an antique industry “must have.” To this day, the SAPG’s release is anticipated by collectors world wide.

In 1983, Bill and Meredith became interested in quilts and their makers. After attending a quilt show in Paducah and later the National Quilting Association show in Bell Buckle, Tennessee, they decided that they would bring further attention to the extraordinary works of art that today’s quiltmakers were creating. Out of their interest, the American Quilter’s Society was born.

In the summer of 1990, ground was broken for the construction of The Museum of the American Quilter’s Society, fondly dubbed MAQS by quilters the world over.

From www.collectorbooks.com
    — Submitted January 18, 2008, by Kevin W. of Stafford, Virginia.

 
Categories. 20th CenturyArts, Letters, Music
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on January 18, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 1,855 times since then and 48 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on January 18, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   2, 3, 4. submitted on January 18, 2008, by Kevin W. of Stafford, Virginia. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page.
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