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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Charleston in Charleston County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Colonel John Stuart House

circa 1767

 
 
Colonel John Stuart House Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, September 29, 2011
1. Colonel John Stuart House Marker
Inscription. National Historic Landmark
Born 1718, Inverness, Stuart was related to Scottish Royality. Educated in London, he circumnavigated the globe aboard Centurion, Adm. Lord Anson commanding, capturing the Spanish treasure galleon, De Cavodonga, in 1743; he arrived in Charleston 1748. Appointed Crown Superintendent of Indian Affairs in the South, he conducted the Congress of Augusta, 1763, and missions to the Florida tribes. As a Loyalist, he was forced to flee during the Revolution and this property was was confiscated. He died in Florida 1779. At his death, Sir Henry Clinton wrote, "The loss of so faithful and useful a servant to His Majesty is at all times to be regretted, but at this critical juncture is most sincerely to be lamented."

The house is a rare example of a colonial side-passage plan. Notable entrance with Corinthian columns possibly derived from Oakley's Magazine of Architecture of 1730. Porches and side wing c. 1840. Significant restoration by Architect Mead Howells 1935.
 
Erected by The Preservation Society of Charleston.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the National Historic Landmarks marker series.
 
Location. 32° 46.465′ 
Colonel John Stuart House Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, September 29, 2011
2. Colonel John Stuart House Marker
♦ Listed in the National Register of Historic Places October 22, 1970;
♦ Designated a National Historic Landmark November 7, 1973.
Stuart, Col. John, House *** (added 1970 - - #70000578)
104--106 Tradd St. , Charleston
♦ Historic Significance: Architecture/Engineering
♦ Architectural Style: Georgian
♦ Area of Significance: Architecture
♦ Period of Significance: 1750-1799
N, 79° 55.999′ W. Marker is in Charleston, South Carolina, in Charleston County. Marker is on Tradd Street near Orange Street, on the left when traveling east. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 106 Tradd Street, Charleston SC 29401, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Samuel Wainwright House (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); 32 Legare Street (about 300 feet away); Dewar-Lee-Pringle House (about 400 feet away); 54 King Street (about 400 feet away); Edgar Wells House (about 400 feet away); 123 Tradd Street (about 400 feet away); 125 Tradd Street (about 500 feet away); The Reverend Paul Trapier Gervais House (about 500 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Charleston.
 
Regarding Colonel John Stuart House. Colonel John Stuart was appointed the King’s Superintendent of Indian Affairs for the Southern District in 1762. By 1765 he obtained full imperial status for his department and was active in handling the Indian affairs of East and West Florida. In 1770 he was named “councillor extraordiary” to advise the governors of Virginia, the provinces and their boards on Indian affairs. Stuart was arrested early in June 1775 on the charge of attempting to incite the Catawba and Cherokee in the British interest. He fled from Lady’s
Colonel John Stuart House Markers including the smaller plaque : image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, October 6, 2011
3. Colonel John Stuart House Markers including the smaller plaque :
Colonel JohnStuart House
c. 1778
Is protected
by a
Conservation
Easement
donated to
Historic
Charleston
Foundation
1984
Island to Florida, where he remained until his death in 1779. John Stuart built the three-story frame residence about 1772. The house has a hipped roof, captain’s walk, and one interior chimney. The narrow south façade is flush boarded and the other elevations are clapboarded. First and second story windows in the narrow façade are flanked with dog-ear trim and crowned with bracketed triangular pediments. The fanlighted entrance is located on the left bay of the front elevation. Its frontispiece is highlighted by Corinthian pilasters and a denticulated pediment. The two-story piazza along the west side was added in the 19th century. Bedroom and service additions of two stories were also added at a later period. Listed in the National Register October 22, 1970; Designated a National Historic Landmark November 7, 1973. (South Carolina Department of Archives and History)
 
Additional comments.
1. John Stuart,
recently arrived from Scotland, became Superintendent of Indian Affairs for the Southern District in 1762—the counterpart of Sir William Johnson of the Northern District. He became an influential member of various colonial councils and in 1772, at the height of his career, at a cost of £18,000, he built a fine three-story white frame residence in Charleston. He lived here until the outbreak
Colonel John Stuart House and Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, September 29, 2011
4. Colonel John Stuart House and Marker
of the War for Independence when he fled to British Florida where he continued to manage British-Indian relations in the South until his death in 1779. The Stuart House is surmounted by a hip roof with a captain's walk. The house is privately owned and has been remodeled in the original style. (National Park Service; Colonials and Patriots)
    — Submitted October 9, 2011, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.

 
Categories. Notable Buildings
 
Colonel John Stuart House image. Click for full size.
South Carolina Department of Archives and History, circa 1973
5. Colonel John Stuart House
Colonel John Stuart House, Historic American Engineering Record image. Click for full size.
Historic American Buildings Survey, C.O. Greene, circa May 1940
6. Colonel John Stuart House, Historic American Engineering Record
Habs 20 SC,10-CHAR,81-3
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on October 9, 2011, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 485 times since then and 39 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on October 10, 2011, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.
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