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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Yuma in Yuma County, Arizona — The American Mountains (Southwest)
 

Castle Dome Mining District

1864 - 1979

 
 
Castle Dome Mining District Marker image. Click for full size.
By Frank Houdek, April 18, 2009
1. Castle Dome Mining District Marker
Inscription. In 1863 Jacob Snively, founder of Gila City, and right hand to Sam Houston, avenger of the Alamo, following blazes left on the saguaros by Mexican and Conquistador predecessors, came to Castle Dome, and within 15 years, Castle Dome City’s population rivaled that of nearby Yuma.

In 1871, the Floral Temple mine within the district had the distinction of being the second patented mine in Arizona. The Castle Dome Mine with 7 shafts was patented in 1876. In 1878, Castle Dome Mine built the world’s largest wagon, with a capacity of 20 tons. The wagon required a team of forty horses or mules to pull.

The mines in the district proved so rich they helped sustain centuries of off-and-on enterprise. The Government’s need for lead brought another boom to Castle Dome during WWI. After falling silent during the Great Depression, the town sprang to life again in the early 1940’s thanks again to the need for lead. During WW2 over 9,000,000 pounds of lead ore was mined out of the area, leading Castle Dome to be considered one of Japan’s top targets, if they had long range bombers.

In 1993 Allen and Stephanie Armstrong bought the property, and salvaged much of the buildings and artifacts located in and around the Museum.
 
Erected 2009 by E Clampus Vitus Lost Dutchman Chapter 5917+4.
Castle Dome Mining District Marker image. Click for full size.
By Frank Houdek, April 18, 2009
2. Castle Dome Mining District Marker
The marker is mounted on a rock at the Castle Dome Mining Museum.

 
Marker series. This marker is included in the E Clampus Vitus marker series.
 
Location. 33° 2.766′ N, 114° 10.668′ W. Marker is near Yuma, Arizona, in Yuma County. Marker can be reached from Castle Dome Mine Road 10 miles east of U.S. 95. Touch for map. The Museum is located 30 Miles North of Yuma and 45 miles South of Quartzsite. Marker is in this post office area: Yuma AZ 85365, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 1 other marker is within walking distance of this marker. Flora Temple Mine (within shouting distance of this marker).
 
More about this marker. Additional driving directions: From Quartzsite head south on US 95. From Yuma head north on US 95. At mile marker 55 turn East on Castle Dome Mine Road. The first 3 miles are paved. The next 7 miles are gravel. At the Y keep to the left. Do not take Big Eye Mine Road
 
Also see . . .  Castle Dome Mine Museum. The website of the museum offering a brief history and photos. (Submitted on October 31, 2011.) 
 
Categories. EducationIndustry & CommerceNatural Resources
 
One of the Buildings with Ladies in Period Dress. image. Click for full size.
By Frank Houdek, April 18, 2009
3. One of the Buildings with Ladies in Period Dress.
Lost Dutchman 5917+4 ECV Members Group at Marker Dedication. image. Click for full size.
By Frank Houdek, April 18, 2009
4. Lost Dutchman 5917+4 ECV Members Group at Marker Dedication.
Castle Dome Mining District Buildings image. Click for full size.
By Frank Houdek, April 18, 2009
5. Castle Dome Mining District Buildings
Another Building image. Click for full size.
By Frank Houdek, April 18, 2009
6. Another Building
There are many buildings restored with all types of great old time items on display.
View of Buildings. image. Click for full size.
By Frank Houdek, April 18, 2009
7. View of Buildings.
Another View of Buildings. image. Click for full size.
By Frank Houdek, April 18, 2009
8. Another View of Buildings.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on October 29, 2011, by Frank Houdek of Kingman, Arizona. This page has been viewed 885 times since then and 50 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8. submitted on October 29, 2011, by Frank Houdek of Kingman, Arizona. • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page.
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