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Fort Worth in Tarrant County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Site of the First Masonic Hall in Fort Worth

 
 
Site of the First Masonic Hall in Fort Worth Marker image. Click for full size.
By Denise Boose, May 20, 2010
1. Site of the First Masonic Hall in Fort Worth Marker
Inscription. After many years of debate, Fort Worth researchers identified this site in 1957 as the location of the city's first Masonic lodge. For more than twenty years, lodge members met in a two story hall at this location. The group organized in 1854 and received its charter the following year as Fort Worth Masonic Lodge No. 148, A.F. & A.M. Members initially rented space for meetings and began construction on their own lodge hall in 1857. The new building offered space for lodge functions on the second floor, which was a single room, and the Masonic group operated a school on the ground level. The first floor space was divided into two rooms and was available for public meetings and church services.

Donated to the lodge by Middleton T. Johnson, the site of the lodge once lay outside the city's populated area. The hall sat well beyond the old fort grounds, and even at about four blocks east of the public square it was built on unplatted land outside the city's business district. Although plain in appearance, the red-brick building signified progress and civilization. Its two stories faced west with a bell tower over the main entrance. In 1871, Lawrence Steel, a member, sold the lodge an English-made bell (c. 1782) that became known as the Masonic bell. It rang to announce stagecoach arrivals, fires and the start of the school day.

By
Masonic Awareness Historical Educational Marker image. Click for full size.
By Denise Boose, May 20, 2010
2. Masonic Awareness Historical Educational Marker
Sponsored by Robert Phillip Holmes, Past Master Fort Worth Lodge No. 148 Dedicated to Sebastian and Brody Broussard
1878, the Masons had outgrown their lodge hall at this site, and they moved to a new building at Second and Main. Lodge No. 148 has continued to be a strong presence in the community, spawning an additional fifteen lodges in Fort Worth.
 
Erected 2006 by Texas Historical Commission. (Marker Number 13486.)
 
Location. 32° 45.448′ N, 97° 20.067′ W. Marker is in Fort Worth, Texas, in Tarrant County. Marker is at the intersection of West Belknap Street (State Highway 347 Spur) and North Houston Street (Business U.S. 287), on the right when traveling west on West Belknap Street. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 200 W Belknap St, Fort Worth TX 76102, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Fort Worth (here, next to this marker); The Site of Camp Worth (here, next to this marker); Tarrant County Criminal Courts Building (a few steps from this marker); Leonard Brothers Department Store (within shouting distance of this marker); First School (within shouting distance of this marker); 1784 Tarrant County 1815 (about 400 feet away, measured
Tarrant County Criminal Courts Building and Site of the First Masonic Hall in Fort Worth Marker image. Click for full size.
By Denise Boose, May 20, 2010
3. Tarrant County Criminal Courts Building and Site of the First Masonic Hall in Fort Worth Marker
in a direct line); "The Stage Leaves From Here" (approx. 0.2 miles away); Fort Worth's First Telephone Exchange (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Fort Worth.
 
Categories. Fraternal or Sororal Organizations
 
Masonic Hall Stone image. Click for full size.
By Denise Boose, May 20, 2010
4. Masonic Hall Stone
This stone was laid by
Fort Worth Lodge
No. 148
A.F. & A.M.
August 4, A.D. 1917-A.L.5917
C.W. Goerte
Worshipful Master
Chas. B. Brown
Secretary
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on February 17, 2012, by Denise Boose of Tehachapi, California. This page has been viewed 434 times since then and 53 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on February 17, 2012, by Denise Boose of Tehachapi, California. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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