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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Fort Worth in Tarrant County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

The First Bulldogger

 
 
The First Bulldogger Marker image. Click for full size.
By Denise Boose, May 22, 2010
1. The First Bulldogger Marker
Inscription.
W.M. "Bill" Pickett (1870-1932) originated the rodeo event of Bulldogging, known today as steer wrestling.

Native Texan Pickett developed a unique style of bulldogging, which made him world famous as a Wild West Show and Rodeo Performer. Bill would leap from the left side of his horse, catch the steer by the horns, twist the animal's neck until he was able to reach over and sink his teeth into the steer's lip.

In 1908, Pickett appeared in the Coliseum during the Fort Worth Stock Show. It was one of several performances here.

Bill died of injuries received when he was kicked in the head by a wild horse while working for the Miller Brothers 101 Ranch. Colonel Zack Miller wrote a poem to this memory. These last lines sum up the respect earned by this cowboy.

Like many men in the old time West,
on any job he did his best
he left a blank that's hard to fill
for there'll never be another Bill.

In 1971, Bill Pickett became the first Black cowboy to be inducted into the National Cowboy Hall of Fame.

Artist: Lisa Perry
Presented to the City of Fort Worth on May 23, 1987, Sponsor The North Fort Worth Historical Society
 
Erected 1987 by The North Fort Worth Historical Society.
The First Bulldogger Marker image. Click for full size.
By Denise Boose, May 22, 2010
2. The First Bulldogger Marker

 
Location. 32° 47.339′ N, 97° 20.875′ W. Marker is in Fort Worth, Texas, in Tarrant County. Marker is at the intersection of East Exchange Avenue and Rodeo Plaza, on the left when traveling east on East Exchange Avenue. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 130 E Exchange Ave, Fort Worth TX 76164, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Coliseum (here, next to this marker); Early Quarter Horse Shows (within shouting distance of this marker); Fort Worth Stock Yards Entrance (within shouting distance of this marker); Thannisch Block Building (within shouting distance of this marker); Thomas B. Saunders Family (within shouting distance of this marker); Fort Worth Stockyards Horse and Mule Barns (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Fort Worth Livestock Exchange (about 400 feet away); Fort Worth Stock Yards Company (about 400 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Fort Worth.
 
Related marker. Click here for another marker that is related to this marker. the relationship ,see marker shown.
 
Also see . . .  Pickett, William. The Handbook of Texas Online, Texas State Historical Association (Submitted on February 19, 2012, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. African AmericansEntertainmentSports
 
The First Bulldogger sculpture image. Click for full size.
By Denise Boose, May 22, 2010
3. The First Bulldogger sculpture
Appreciation To Marker image. Click for full size.
By Denise Boose, May 22, 2010
4. Appreciation To Marker
Bill Pickett Poster image. Click for full size.
By Denise Boose, May 22, 2010
5. Bill Pickett Poster
Located in Fire Station No.1 at Second and Commerce streets, downtown Fort Worth.
“The First Bulldogger, Bill Picket” image. Click for full size.
By Michael Stroud, circa November 1998
6. “The First Bulldogger, Bill Picket”
10 foot high 1986 bronze by Lisa Perry is in North Forth Worth, Texas. It depicts Bill Picket wrestling a steer to the ground. The inscription reads “The first bulldogger, W. M. ‘Bill’ Picket (1870–1932) originated the rodeo event of bulldogging, known today as steer wrestling....”
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on February 18, 2012, by Denise Boose of Tehachapi, California. This page has been viewed 512 times since then and 51 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on February 18, 2012, by Denise Boose of Tehachapi, California.   6. submitted on December 20, 2007, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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