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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Sanford in Seminole County, Florida — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Georgetown and Goldsboro

 
 
Georgetown and Goldsboro Marker image. Click for full size.
By AGS Media, December 30, 2011
1. Georgetown and Goldsboro Marker
Inscription. African Americans were first brought to the Sanford area by slave-holding families settling in the Fort Mellon area during the 1840s. Later in the nineteenth century, Henry Sanford welcomed black residents to his city when it was established in 1870 during the time of Reconstruction. Mr. Sanford attempted to use black laborers in his citrus groves, but was discouraged by the violent reaction of some locals.

In the 1880s, Henry Sanford created the African American neighborhood of Georgetown on the east side of the city. Mr. Sanford was encouraging the rise of a black middle class in the area. Sanford Avenue served as the new neighborhood's main street.

Georgetown's best-known resident, Zora Neale Hurston, wrote her first published novel, Jonah's Gourd Vine (1934), while in Sanford. Hurston is famous for her book Their Eyes Were Watching God (1937). Later on, Hurston was also part of the Harlem Renaissance while living in New York. She is recognized as the most prolific African American writer of her time. Many of her books are set in small communities like Sanford.

The African American town of Goldsboro, on the west side of the City of Sanford, was incorporated in 1891 and then annexed into the City of Sanford in 1911.

[ three photos ]
This class photograph shows Georgetown's
Georgetown and Goldsboro Marker image. Click for full size.
By AGS Media, December 30, 2011
2. Georgetown and Goldsboro Marker
School class photo from Georgetown
younger residents.


Zora Neale Hurston

Many of Sanford's African American residents have served as proud members of the United States military.

photographs courtesy of Sanford Museum

 
Erected by the City of Sanford.
 
Location. 28° 48.775′ N, 81° 15.351′ W. Marker is in Sanford, Florida, in Seminole County. Marker is on East Seminole Boulevard west of North Mellonville Avenue, on the left when traveling east. Touch for map. The marker is located overlooking Lake Monroe near the eastern end of the Sanford RiverWalk. Marker is in this post office area: Sanford FL 32771, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Fort Mellon and Mellonville (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Site of Fort Mellon (about 400 feet away); Early Hospitals in Sanford (about 700 feet away); Hotel Forrest Lake (about 800 feet away); Sanford's First Residents (approx. 0.3 miles away); Henry Shelton Sanford (approx. 0.4 miles away); Fort Mellon Park (approx. 0.4 miles away); Citrus to Celery (approx. half a mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Sanford.
 
More about this marker. The marker is capped with the logo of the
Georgetown and Goldsboro Marker image. Click for full size.
By AGS Media, December 30, 2011
3. Georgetown and Goldsboro Marker
Zora Neale Hurston, one-time resident of Georgetown
City of Sanford.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker.
 
Also see . . .  Official web site of Zora Neale Hurston. (Submitted on April 7, 2012, by Glenn Sheffield of Tampa, Florida.)
 
Categories. African AmericansArts, Letters, MusicSettlements & Settlers
 
Georgetown and Goldsboro Marker image. Click for full size.
By AGS Media, December 30, 2011
4. Georgetown and Goldsboro Marker
African American veterans in a Sanford parade
Georgetown and Goldsboro Marker image. Click for full size.
By AGS Media, December 30, 2011
5. Georgetown and Goldsboro Marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on April 7, 2012, by Glenn Sheffield of Tampa, Florida. This page has been viewed 450 times since then and 27 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on April 7, 2012, by Glenn Sheffield of Tampa, Florida. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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