Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Logan Circle in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Vermont Avenue Baptist Church

1530 Vermont Avenue, NW

 

—African American Heritage Trail, Washington, DC —

 
Vermont Avenue Baptist Church Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, February 25, 2012
1. Vermont Avenue Baptist Church Marker
Inscription.
Vermont Avenue Baptist Church was formed in 1866 by seven formerly enslaved men and women meeting in the home of John and Amy Slaughter. They joined the Nineteenth Street Baptist Church for assistance in organizing their own church. Then, led by Rev. John Henry Brooks, a former Union Army wagon driver, the group acquired this site and built a small wooden structure that they named Fifth Baptist Church. They later replaced it with a brick building (now the main sanctuary), laying the cornerstone in 1872. Under Rev. Brooks’ successor, Rev. George Wellington Lee (1885-1911), the growing congregation added the current façade and steeple, and adopted the current name in 1890.

Photo caption: Vermont Avenue Baptist Church, about 1899 Library of Congress
 
Erected by Cultural Tourism DC - Funded by the DC Historic Preservation Office.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Washington, D.C. African American Heritage Trail marker series.
 
Location. 38° 54.715′ N, 77° 1.708′ W. Marker is in Logan Circle, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker is at the intersection of Vermont Avenue, NW and 15th Street, NW, on the right when traveling south on Vermont Avenue,
Vermont Avenue Baptist Church Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, February 25, 2012
2. Vermont Avenue Baptist Church Marker
NW. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1530 Vermont Avenue, NW, Washington DC 20009, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. “Contraband” to Community (within shouting distance of this marker); Logan Circle Just Ahead (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); Like a Village (about 500 feet away); If These Mansions Could Talk (about 700 feet away); Charles M. “Sweet Daddy” Grace Residence (about 800 feet away); Pratt House (approx. 0.2 miles away); Belford V. Lawson and Marjorie M. Lawson Residence (approx. 0.2 miles away); John Logan Memorial (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Logan Circle.
 
Also see . . .  Vermont Avenue Baptist Church: "We've Come This Far by Faith". (Submitted on April 19, 2012, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.)
 
Additional keywords. "Greater 14th Street"
 
Categories. African AmericansChurches, Etc.Notable BuildingsNotable Persons
 
Rev. John Henry Brooks image. Click for full size.
February 25, 2012
3. Rev. John Henry Brooks
- civilian teamster for the U.S. Army during the Civil War, and the first pastor of the Vermont Avenue Baptist Church.
Vermont Avenue Baptist Church image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, February 25, 2012
4. Vermont Avenue Baptist Church
Vermont Avenue Baptist Church, ca. 1899 image. Click for full size.
Library of Congress
5. Vermont Avenue Baptist Church, ca. 1899
This photo (used on marker) was reportedly displayed at the American Negro Exhibit at the Paris Exposition of 1900.
Vermont Avenue Baptist Church image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 30, 2014
6. Vermont Avenue Baptist Church
Cornerstone image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 30, 2014
7. Cornerstone
Vermont Avenue
Baptist Church
Organized
June 5 A.D. 1866
Built 1872
Remodeled 1890
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on April 19, 2012, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. This page has been viewed 473 times since then and 23 times this year. Last updated on April 20, 2012, by Keith S Smith of West Chester, Pennsylvania. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on April 19, 2012, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.   5, 6, 7. submitted on December 13, 2014, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
Paid Advertisement