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Santa Fe in Santa Fe County, New Mexico — The American Mountains (Southwest)
 

U.S.S. Santa Fe CL-60

 
 
U.S.S. Santa Fe CL-60 Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, April 17, 2012
1. U.S.S. Santa Fe CL-60 Marker
Inscription. The officers and crew of the light cruiser, U.S.S. Santa Fe, dedicate this plaque to the memory of the gallant men who fought and served aboard her from 1942 to 1946.
 
Erected 1975 by the U.S.S. Santa Fe Veterans on their 30th reunion, August 7, 8, 9, and 10.
 
Location. 35° 41.235′ N, 105° 56.33′ W. Marker is in Santa Fe, New Mexico, in Santa Fe County. Marker is at the intersection of San Francisco Street and Lincoln Avenue, on the right when traveling east on San Francisco Street. Touch for map. It is on the edge of the plaza, facing San Francisco Street. Marker is in this post office area: Santa Fe NM 87501, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. To the Heroes (within shouting distance of this marker); La Castrense (within shouting distance of this marker); End of Santa Fe Trail (within shouting distance of this marker); Santa Fe Plaza (within shouting distance of this marker); Annexation of New Mexico (within shouting distance of this marker); El Palacio Real (within shouting distance of this marker); Santa Fe Trail (within shouting distance of this marker); The Spitz Clock (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Santa Fe.
 
Also see . . .
U.S.S. <i>Santa Fe</i> at sea during the Philippines Campaign image. Click for full size.
United States Navy, December 12, 1944
2. U.S.S. Santa Fe at sea during the Philippines Campaign
Courtesy of Wikipedia Commons.
 Wikipedia Entry. “Santa Fe sortied from the Marshalls with a group centered around carrier Bunker Hill, and guarded her consorts during intense air strikes on Saipan, Tinian, and Guam from 11-16 June 1944 in support of landings on Saipan. But the Japanese fleet raced into the area to make a major effort to save the Marianas. On the morning of 19 June, swarms of Japanese carrier aircraft attacked the American 5th Fleet. Santa Fe's guns contributed to an almost impenetrable shield of flak which protected the US carriers while American naval aviators destroyed Japan's naval air arm. Through the night and into the following day, the 5th Fleet pursued the retiring enemy warships, located them at mid-afternoon, and launched planes for a successful attack. That night, Santa Fe, ignoring possible Japanese submarines, turned on her lights to help guide the American planes back to their carriers.” (Submitted on April 29, 2012, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. War, World II
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on April 29, 2012, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page has been viewed 491 times since then and 47 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on April 29, 2012, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia.
 
Editor’s want-list for this marker. Wide photo showing the plaque's location within the plaza • Can you help?
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