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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Galveston in Galveston County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Original Oleander Planting in Galveston

 
 
Original Oleander Planting in Galveston Marker image. Click for full size.
By Jim Evans, July 8, 2012
1. Original Oleander Planting in Galveston Marker
Inscription. Brought from Jamaica, 1841, by local businessman Joseph Osterman; planted by Osterman's sister, Mrs. Isidore Dyer, in yard of her home at this location. Transplanted when new structure was placed here, 1939, this oleander is an outgrowth of original Dyer planting.
 
Erected 1970 by State Historical Survey Committee. (Marker Number 7540.)
 
Location. 29° 18.027′ N, 94° 47.667′ W. Marker is in Galveston, Texas, in Galveston County. Marker is at the intersection of Sealy Avenue and 25th Street, on the left when traveling west on Sealy Avenue. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Galveston TX 77550, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Open Gates (was within shouting distance of this marker but has been reported missing. ); The Eugenia & George Sealy Pavilion ( about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); Ashton Villa, 1859 ( about 500 feet away); The Rosenberg Library ( about 700 feet away); The Moody Home ( about 800 feet away); Galveston Office of the National Weather Service ( approx.
Original Oleander Planting in Galveston Marker image. Click for full size.
By Jim Evans, July 8, 2012
2. Original Oleander Planting in Galveston Marker
The flowering bush on the corner is an oleander. Galveston is famous for oleanders and has many throughout the island.
0.2 miles away); Sweeney-Royston House ( approx. 0.2 miles away); Congregation B'nai Israel Synagogue ( approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Galveston.
 
Also see . . .
1. History of the Oleander in the United States. Surprise. They began in Galveston (Submitted on July 9, 2012, by Jim Evans of Houston, Texas.) 

2. Galveston's Oleander Festival. (Submitted on July 9, 2012, by Jim Evans of Houston, Texas.)
 
Categories. Horticulture & Forestry
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on July 9, 2012, by Jim Evans of Houston, Texas. This page has been viewed 345 times since then and 46 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on July 9, 2012, by Jim Evans of Houston, Texas. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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