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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Jacksonville Beach in Duval County, Florida — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

First Settlers At Ruby, Florida

 
 
First Settlers At Ruby, Florida Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, July 10, 2012
1. First Settlers At Ruby, Florida Marker
Inscription. In 1883 construction of the Jacksonville and Atlantic Railroad was begun to serve this undeveloped area. The track was narrow-gauge, running 16.54 miles from the south bank of the St. Johns River to the beach. The first settlers were William Edward Scull, a civil engineer and surveyor, and his wife Eleanor Kennedy Scull. They lived in a tent two blocks east of Pablo Historical Park. A second tent was the general store and post office. On August 22, 1884 Mrs. Scull was appointed postmaster. mail was dispatched by horse and buggy up the beach to Mayport, and from there to Jacksonville by steamer. The Jacksonville and Atlantic Railroad company sold lots and housing construction began. The Sculls built the first house in 1884 on their tent site. The settlement was named Ruby for their first daughter. On May 13, 1886 the town was renamed Pablo Beach. On June 15, 1925, the name was changed to Jacksonville Beach.
 
Erected 1984 by Beaches Area Historical Society, Inc. Centennial Year in Cooperation with Department of State. (Marker Number F-305.)
 
Location. 30° 17.306′ N, 81° 23.592′ W. Marker is in Jacksonville Beach, Florida, in Duval County. Marker is on Beach Boulevard (U.S. 90) near N 4th Street, on the right
Newly restored First Settlers At Ruby, Florida Marker image. Click for full size.
By Tim Fillmon, April 8, 2016
2. Newly restored First Settlers At Ruby, Florida Marker
when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Jacksonville Beach FL 32250, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Beaches Museum Chapel (here, next to this marker); Mayport Depot (here, next to this marker); Pablo Beach Post Office (a few steps from this marker); Porter Wood Burning Locomotive (within shouting distance of this marker); Doolittle's 1922 Record Flight (within shouting distance of this marker); Pablo Beach FEC Foreman's House (within shouting distance of this marker); Oesterreicher-McCormick Homestead (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); American Red Cross Volunteer Life Saving Corps and Station (approx. mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Jacksonville Beach.
 
Also see . . .  Jacksonville Beach, Florida, from Wikipedia. Like most of northeast Florida, the Jacksonville Beach area was originally inhabited by the Timucua peoples. Though the Jacksonville Beaches region was one of the first parts of what is now the continental United States to see settlement during the period of European colonization ... (Submitted on July 17, 2012, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 
 
Categories. Notable Places
 
First Settlers At Ruby, Florida Marker, looking west along Beach Blvd image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, July 10, 2012
3. First Settlers At Ruby, Florida Marker, looking west along Beach Blvd
First Settlers At Ruby, Florida Marker, seen near N 4th Street image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, July 10, 2012
4. First Settlers At Ruby, Florida Marker, seen near N 4th Street
First Settlers At Ruby, Florida Marker, seen looking east along Beach Blvd. (US 90) image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, July 10, 2012
5. First Settlers At Ruby, Florida Marker, seen looking east along Beach Blvd. (US 90)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on July 17, 2012, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 511 times since then and 54 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on July 20, 2012, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   2. submitted on April 9, 2016, by Tim Fillmon of Webster, Florida.   3, 4, 5. submitted on July 20, 2012, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.
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