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Atlantic City in Atlantic County, New Jersey — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

New Jersey Korean War Memorial

 
 
Freedom is Not Free! image. Click for full size.
By R. C., October 20, 2007
1. Freedom is Not Free!
Inscription.
Freedom is Not Free

[Following the title is a list of New Jersey veterans who died in the Korean War. See link below for a list of "those who did not return."]
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Medal of Honor Recipients marker series.
 
Location. 39° 21.367′ N, 74° 25.867′ W. Marker is in Atlantic City, New Jersey, in Atlantic County. Marker is at the intersection of Atlantic City Boardwalk and Park Place on Atlantic City Boardwalk. Touch for map. Memorial is located in Brighton Park on the Atlantic City Boardwalk end of the park. Marker is in this post office area: Atlantic City NJ 08401, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. They Called It “KY & The Curb” (approx. 0.2 miles away); Pierre Hollingsworth (approx. 0.2 miles away); How Chicken Bone Beach Got Its Name (approx. mile away); James L. Usry (approx. 0.3 miles away); Jeremiah Leeds (approx. 0.3 miles away); Spanish War Marker (approx. 0.3 miles away); Home of the Miss America Pageant (approx. 0.3 miles away); Camp Boardwalk (approx. 0.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Atlantic City.
 
Also see . . .
1. The New Jersey Korean War Veterans Memorial Website
Dedication Plaque image. Click for full size.
By R. C., October 20, 2007
2. Dedication Plaque
The New Jersey Korean War Memorial was made possible by the State of New Jersey with the assistance of generous contributions from the Casino Reinvestment Development Authority, The City of Atlantic City, New Jersey corporations, organizations, and citizens.

This memorial was built in honor of all those from the state who served with courage, dignity, and patriotism in the Armed Forces of The United States of America during the Korean War.
. (Submitted on February 28, 2008, by Kevin W. of Stafford, Virginia.)
2. Those who did not return.. A list of the honored Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen, and Marines whose names are engraved on the Memorial. (Submitted on February 28, 2008, by Kevin W. of Stafford, Virginia.) 

3. Congressional Medal of Honor Recipient, First Lieutenant Samuel S. Coursen. (Submitted on February 28, 2008, by Kevin W. of Stafford, Virginia.)
 
Categories. MilitaryWar, Korean
 
American Soldier, Korean Era image. Click for full size.
By R. C., October 20, 2007
3. American Soldier, Korean Era
Notice the boots on the soldier. This was still the "Brown Boot Army."
A Fallen Comrade image. Click for full size.
By R. C., October 20, 2007
4. A Fallen Comrade
Detail of Amerian Korean War Soldier image. Click for full size.
By R. C., October 20, 2007
5. Detail of Amerian Korean War Soldier
He's holding the "dogtags" of his fallen brothers.
Korean War Congressional Medal of Honor Recipients image. Click for full size.
By R. C., October 20, 2007
6. Korean War Congressional Medal of Honor Recipients
Edward C. Benfold Nelson V. Brittin Hector A. Cafferata, Jr. Samuel S. Coursen
See links above to view their Medal of Honor Citations
New Jersey Korean War Memorial-Edward C Benfold grave marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, March 16, 2000
7. New Jersey Korean War Memorial-Edward C Benfold grave marker
He was a Korean War Congressional Medal of Honor Recipient and is buried in Beverly National Cemetery Section DS, site 12. He was Killed in Action. His Medal of Honor information and citation is: *BENFOLD, EDWARD C. Rank and organization: Hospital Corpsman Third Class, U.S. Navy, attached to a company in the 1st Marine Division. Place and date: Korea, 5 September 1952. Entered service at: Philadelphia, Pa. Citation: For gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty while serving in operations against enemy aggressor forces. When his company was subjected to heavy artillery and mortar barrages, followed by a determined assault during the hours of darkness by an enemy force estimated at battalion strength, HC3c. Benfold resolutely moved from position to position in the face of intense hostile fire, treating the wounded and lending words of encouragement. Leaving the protection of his sheltered position to treat the wounded when the platoon area in which he was working was attacked from both the front and rear, he moved forward to an exposed ridge line where he observed 2 marines in a large crater. As he approached the 2 men to determine their condition, an enemy soldier threw 2 grenades into the crater while 2 other enemy charged the position. Picking up a grenade in each hand, HC3c Benfold leaped out of the crater and hurled himself against the on-rushing hostile soldiers, pushing the grenades against their chests and killing both the attackers. Mortally wounded while carrying out this heroic act, HC3c. Benfold, by his great personal valor and resolute spirit of self-sacrifice in the face of almost certain death, was directly responsible for saving the lives of his 2 comrades. His exceptional courage reflects the highest credit upon himself and enhances the finest traditions of the U.S. Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for others.
New Jersey Korean War Memorial Marker-Nelson V Brittin grave marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, March 16, 2000
8. New Jersey Korean War Memorial Marker-Nelson V Brittin grave marker
He is a Korean War Congressional Medal of Honor Recipient. He is buried in Beverly National Cemetery Section DS, site 2. He was Killed in Action. His Medal of Honor information and citation is: *BRITTIN, NELSON V. Rank and organization: Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, Company I, 19th Infantry Regiment. Place and date: Vicinity of Yonggong-ni, Korea, 7 March 1951. Entered service at: Audubon, N.J. G.O. No.: 12, 1 February 1952. Citation: Sfc. Brittin, a member of Company I, distinguished himself by conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity above and beyond the call of duty in action. Volunteering to lead his squad up a hill, with meager cover against murderous fire from the enemy, he ordered his squad to give him support and, in the face of withering fire and bursting shells, he tossed a grenade at the nearest enemy position. On returning to his squad, he was knocked down and wounded by an enemy grenade. Refusing medical attention, he replenished his supply of grenades and returned, hurling grenades into hostile positions and shooting the enemy as they fled. When his weapon jammed, he leaped without hesitation into a foxhole and killed the occupants with his bayonet and the butt of his rifle. He continued to wipe out foxholes and, noting that his squad had been pinned down, he rushed to the rear of a machine gun position, threw a grenade into the nest, and ran around to its front, where he killed all 3 occupants with his rifle. Less than 100 yards up the hill, his squad again came under vicious fire from another camouflaged, sandbagged, machine gun nest well-flanked by supporting riflemen. Sfc. Brittin again charged this new position in an aggressive endeavor to silence this remaining obstacle and ran direct into a burst of automatic fire which killed him instantly. In his sustained and driving action, he had killed 20 enemy soldiers and destroyed 4 automatic weapons. The conspicuous courage, consummate valor, and noble self-sacrifice displayed by Sfc. Brittin enabled his inspired company to attain its objective and reflect the highest glory on himself and the heroic traditions of the military service.
New Jersey Korean War Memorial Marker-Hector A Cafferata Jr. grave marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, September 20, 2016
9. New Jersey Korean War Memorial Marker-Hector A Cafferata Jr. grave marker
He is a Korean War Congressional Medal of Honor Recipient. He is buried in Quantico National Cemetery Section 24, site 30. His Medal of Honor information and citation is: CAFFERATA, HECTOR A., JR. Rank and organization: Private, U.S. Marine Corps Reserve, Company F, 2d Battalion, 7th Marines, 1st Marine Division (Rein.). Place and date: Korea, 28 November 1950. Entered service at: Dover, N.J. Citation: For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty while serving as a rifleman with Company F, in action against enemy aggressor forces. When all the other members of his fire team became casualties, creating a gap in the lines, during the initial phase of a vicious attack launched by a fanatical enemy of regimental strength against his company's hill position, Pvt. Cafferata waged a lone battle with grenades and rifle fire as the attack gained momentum and the enemy threatened penetration through the gap and endangered the integrity of the entire defensive perimeter. Making a target of himself under the devastating fire from automatic weapons, rifles, grenades, and mortars, he maneuvered up and down the line and delivered accurate and effective fire against the onrushing force, killing 15, wounding many more, and forcing the others to withdraw so that reinforcements could move up and consolidate the position. Again fighting desperately against a renewed onslaught later that same morning when a hostile grenade landed in a shallow entrenchment occupied by wounded marines, Pvt. Cafferata rushed into the gully under heavy fire, seized the deadly missile in his right hand and hurled it free of his comrades before it detonated, severing part of 1 finger and seriously wounding him in the right hand and arm. Courageously ignoring the intense pain, he staunchly fought on until he was struck by a sniper's bullet and forced to submit to evacuation for medical treatment Stouthearted and indomitable, Pvt. Cafferata, by his fortitude, great personal valor, and dauntless perseverance in the face of almost certain death, saved the lives of several of his fellow marines and contributed essentially to the success achieved by his company in maintaining its defensive position against tremendous odds. His extraordinary heroism throughout was in keeping with the highest traditions of the U.S. Naval Service.
New Jersey Korean War Memorial Marker-Samuel S Coursen grave marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, November 2, 2000
10. New Jersey Korean War Memorial Marker-Samuel S Coursen grave marker
He was a Korean War Congressional Medal of Honor Recipient. He is buried in the West Point Cemetery, U.S. Military Academy Section 7, site E-230. He was Killed in Action. His Medal of Honor information and citation is: *COURSEN, SAMUEL S. Rank and organization: First Lieutenant, U.S. Army, Company C 5th Cavalry Regiment. Place and date: Near Kaesong, Korea, 12 October 1950. Entered service at: Madison, N.J. G.O. No.: 57, 2 August 1951. Citation: 1st Lt. Coursen distinguished himself by conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity above and beyond the call of duty in action. While Company C was attacking Hill 174 under heavy enemy small-arms fire, his platoon received enemy fire from close range. The platoon returned the fire and continued to advance. During this phase 1 his men moved into a well-camouflaged emplacement, which was thought to be unoccupied, and was wounded by the enemy who were hidden within the emplacement. Seeing the soldier in difficulty he rushed to the man's aid and, without regard for his personal safety, engaged the enemy in hand-to-hand combat in an effort to protect his wounded comrade until he himself was killed. When his body was recovered after the battle 7 enemy dead were found in the emplacement. As the result of 1st Lt. Coursen's violent struggle several of the enemies' heads had been crushed with his rifle. His aggressive and intrepid actions saved the life of the wounded man, eliminated the main position of the enemy roadblock, and greatly inspired the men in his command. 1st Lt. Coursen's extraordinary heroism and intrepidity reflect the highest credit on himself and are in keeping with the honored traditions of the military service.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 1, 2017. This page originally submitted on February 28, 2008, by R. C. of Shrewsbury, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 2,806 times since then and 87 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on February 28, 2008, by R. C. of Shrewsbury, New Jersey.   7, 8, 9, 10. submitted on August 26, 2017, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page.
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