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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Greeneville in Greene County, Tennessee — The American South (East South Central)
 

The Homestead Grounds

Andrew Johnson National Historic Site

 
 
The Homestead Grounds Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 4, 2012
1. The Homestead Grounds Marker
Inscription.
There are no written records describing the Homestead grounds as Andrew Johnson knew them from 1869 until 1875. The earliest descriptions of the landscape during that period come from the oral accounts of Andrew Johnsonís descendants twenty-five years after his death.

A reporter for Frank Leslieís Illustrated Newspaper describes the Homestead grounds in 1865 before the Johnsons moved back in as follows: “As you pass along the pavement on Main Street, by looking into the lot you see several young apple trees, and in the spaces between them are potatoes growing. In the rear of the kitchen stands a small aspen shade-tree, and down there in the lower end of the lot is a grape vine, trained upon a trellis forming a pleasant bower. Scattered over the lot are a number of rose, currant, and gooseberry bushes. At the lower end of the lot and just outside stand two large weeping willows, and under their shade is a very beautiful spring . . . . ”

Accordingly to family tradition, the weeping willow trees referred to in the 1865 article were planted by Andrew Johnson in the early 1850s. The trees originated from a cutting given to Johnson by Captain William Francis Lynch, U.S. Navy. Captain Lynch acquired the cutting from a willow tree near the grave of Napoleon, on the Island of St. Helena. The weeping
The Homestead Grounds Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 4, 2012
2. The Homestead Grounds Marker
willow trees that you see today are all descendants of those planted by Andrew Johnson.
 
Erected by National Park Service.
 
Location. 36° 9.662′ N, 82° 49.902′ W. Marker is in Greeneville, Tennessee, in Greene County. Marker can be reached from S Main Street (U.S. 321), on the left when traveling south. Touch for map. The marker is located behind the Andrew Johnson Homestead. Marker is in this post office area: Greeneville TN 37745, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Preserving the Presidentís Legacy ( a few steps from this marker); The Home of the 17th President ( a few steps from this marker); Andrew Johnson National Historic Site ( within shouting distance of this marker); Home of Andrew Johnson ( within shouting distance of this marker); Andrew Johnson Homestead ( within shouting distance of this marker); Valentine Sevier Home ( within shouting distance of this marker); McKee Street "Flagship of Greeneville Mayoralty" ( about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Greene County / Hawkins County ( about 400 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Greeneville.
 
More about this marker. The right side of the marker contains a “Site Plan of the Homestead
Marker at the Andrew Johnson National Historic Site image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 4, 2012
3. Marker at the Andrew Johnson National Historic Site
grounds based on a sketch drawn from memory by Martha Landstreet Willingham, Andrew Johnsonís great granddaughter who lived with her grandmother, Mrs. Martha Johnson Patterson, at the Homestead from 1891 until 1901.”
 
Also see . . .
1. Andrew Johnson National Historic Site. National Park Service website. (Submitted on August 14, 2012, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 

2. Biography of Andrew Johnson. The White House website. (Submitted on August 14, 2012, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 
 
Categories. Notable Places
 
The Homestead Grounds Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 4, 2012
4. The Homestead Grounds Marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on August 14, 2012, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 281 times since then and 30 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on August 14, 2012, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.
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