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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
American Beach in Nassau County, Florida — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

American Beach at the Crossroads

 
 
American Beach at the Crossroads Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 2012
1. American Beach at the Crossroads Marker
Inscription. During the period of racial segregation, African Americans were barred from most of the beaches in Florida. American Beach was founded in 1935 to provide African Americans with beach access in a resort atmosphere. Nana, as the sand dune before you is called, is located at the heart of American Beach.
From 1935 to 2000, “The Crossroads” between Ocean Boulevard and Gregg Street on American Beach was the jumping off place for Black beachgoers. Over summer weekends from the dunes to the sea there were people galore. Like the waves that rush ashore, American Beach was in constant motion.
 
Erected by National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior,Timucuan Ecological and Historic Preserve.
 
Location. 30° 34.378′ N, 81° 26.699′ W. Marker is in American Beach, Florida, in Nassau County. Marker is on Ocean Blvd near Lewis Street, on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. Located at the Nana sand dune. Marker is in this post office area: Fernandina Beach FL 32034, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 7 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. A Dune System Called "NaNa" (a few steps from this marker); Historic American Beach (about 300 feet away, measured
American Beach at the Crossroads Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, August 12, 2012
2. American Beach at the Crossroads Marker
in a direct line); First Home on American Beach (about 600 feet away); Martha's Hideaway (approx. mile away); Franklintown Chapel (approx. half a mile away); Sawpit Bluff Plantation (approx. 4.3 miles away); Mount Olive Baptist Church (approx. 4.4 miles away); Peck High School (approx. 6.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in American Beach.
 
Regarding American Beach at the Crossroads. American Beach a time in American history when all people were not viewed as equals. Yet this beach
also presents us with memories of family time, enjoyment, and relief from the challenges of the work week.
The story of the beach intertwines with the history of north Florida. The geography of the area provided this
secluded island location for African Americans to enjoy the sun and surf. The history and legacy of African American people—from enslavement to freedom to civil rights—can be learned by visiting more sites in the Timucuan Preserve.
 
Also see . . .  From Wikipedia, American Beach.
American Beach at the Crossroads Marker, seen along Ocean Blvd. image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, August 12, 2012
3. American Beach at the Crossroads Marker, seen along Ocean Blvd.
Throughout the 1930s, 1940s, and 1950s, summers at American Beach were busy with families, churches and children. The beach included hotels, restaurants, bathhouses and nightclubs as well as homes and other businesses. (Submitted on August 29, 2012, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 
 
Categories. African AmericansEntertainment
 
American Beach image. Click for full size.
By National Park Service, `
4. American Beach
Pictures included image. Click for full size.
American Beach at the Crossroads Marker, `
5. Pictures included
left: Beachgoers parked along Ocean Boulevard, which runs the length of the sand dune
center: Posing for the camera.
right: Family time is a part of the legacy of American Beach.
American Beach at the Crossroads Marker image. Click for full size.
American Beach at the Crossroads Marker, `
6. American Beach at the Crossroads Marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on August 29, 2012, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 465 times since then and 45 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on August 30, 2012, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.
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