Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Madison in Morgan County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

In Memory of the Boys from Morgan County, Georgia

 
 
In Memory of the Boys from Morgan County, Georgia Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, November 1, 2012
1. In Memory of the Boys from Morgan County, Georgia Marker
Inscription. Erected by
Henry Walton Chapter
Daughters of the America Revolution

In memory of
The Boys From Morgan County, Georgia
Who fought in the World War

April 6, 1917 – November 11, 1918
 
Erected 1930 by Henry Walton Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Daughters of the American Revolution, and the Spirit of the American Doughboy - E. M. Viquesney marker series.
 
Location. 33° 35.741′ N, 83° 28′ W. Marker is in Madison, Georgia, in Morgan County. Marker is at the intersection of Hancock Street and East Jefferson Street, on the right when traveling east on Hancock Street. Touch for map. The marker stands in front of the Morgan County Courthouse. Marker is in this post office area: Madison GA 30650, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. William Tappan Thompson (a few steps from this marker); Morgan County (a few steps from this marker); Oliver Hardy, Genius of Comedy (a few steps from this marker); Civic Advancement (within shouting distance of this marker); Community Settlement
In Memory of the Boys from Morgan County, Georgia Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, November 1, 2012
2. In Memory of the Boys from Morgan County, Georgia Marker
(within shouting distance of this marker); The Town Square (within shouting distance of this marker); Banking Institutions (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Lodging Establishments (about 400 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Madison.
 
Regarding In Memory of the Boys from Morgan County, Georgia. The statue, “The Spirit of the American Doughboy,” was created by E. M. Viquesney in 1920, while he was working in Americus, Georgia. Supposedly “over 400” copies were made, but only about 140 of them are known throughout the United States. Almost all are made of metal, but there are three Viquesney stone Doughboys known, including the Madison statue which is made of marble.

The rifle on the Madison statue is made of zinc.

The Doughboy was acquired with funds provided by the Henry Walton Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution. The monument's base was built by Sam Almand. The sculpture itself was purchased from McNeel Marble Company of Marietta, Georgia.

During the 1990s, Georgia author Philip Lee Williams wrote a poem titled, "The Doughboy Statue on the Square in Madison, Georgia". It's
In Memory of the Boys from Morgan County, Georgia Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, November 1, 2012
3. In Memory of the Boys from Morgan County, Georgia Marker
from his collection, Night Wings, published at www.philipleewilliams.com.

Further information on Viquesney’s Spirit of the American Doughboy, and the Madison Doughboy in particular, is available here:
http://doughboysearcher.weebly.com/madison-georgia.html
 
Categories. War, World I
 
In Memory of the Boys from Morgan County, Georgia Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, November 1, 2012
4. In Memory of the Boys from Morgan County, Georgia Marker
The marker and statue in front of the Morgan County Courthouse.
"The Spirit of the American Doughboy" image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, November 1, 2012
5. "The Spirit of the American Doughboy"
The statue was created by E. M. Visqueney.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on November 2, 2012, by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia. This page has been viewed 410 times since then and 39 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on November 2, 2012, by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
Paid Advertisement