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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Honolulu in Honolulu County, Hawaii — Hawaiian Island Archipelago (Pacific Ocean)
 

First Hawaiian Printing

January 7, 1822

 
 
First Hawaiian Printing Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, October 23, 2008
1. First Hawaiian Printing Marker
Inscription. In a grass house near this site High Chief Keeaumoku pulled the first sheet in the presence of Elisha Loomis, Printer; the Reverend Hiram Bingham; and James Hunnewell, Mission benefactor.
 
Location. 21° 18.239′ N, 157° 51.408′ W. Marker is in Honolulu, Hawaii, in Honolulu County. Marker is on South King Street south of Kawaiahao Street, on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. It is at the Mission Houses Museum. Marker is in this post office area: Honolulu HI 96813, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Reverend James Kekela (within shouting distance of this marker); Kawaiaha'o Landmark (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Hiram Bingham (about 400 feet away); Kawaiaha'o Church (about 400 feet away); a different marker also named Kawaiaha‘o Landmark (about 500 feet away); King William Charles Lunalilo (about 600 feet away); King Kamehameha I (approx. 0.2 miles away); Aliiolani Hale (approx. ¼ mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Honolulu.
 
More about this marker. At the Mission House Museum, in a 1841 building built of coral blocks, is a working replica of the first printing press to be brought to Hawaii. It is demonstrated on a regular
First Hawaiian Printing Marker Stone Relief image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, October 23, 2008
2. First Hawaiian Printing Marker Stone Relief
basis.
 
Also see . . .  Chapter XIX - First Hawaiian Printing. Chapter from the 1923 book by William D. Westervelt. Includes photo of the first page printed. “As soon as the missionaries were sure of the orthography and pronunciation of a number of [Hawaiian] words they prepared a primer or spelling book to be printed for the schools they were carrying on. Mr. Bingham says: ‘On the 7th of January, 1822, we commenced printing the language in order to give them letters, libraries and the living oracles in their own tongue. A considerable number was present, and among those particularly interested was Ke-au-moku (Gov. Cox) who after a little instruction by Mr. Loomis applied the strength of his athletic arm to the lever of a Ramage press, pleased thus to assist in working off a few impressions of the first lessons’.” (Submitted on November 23, 2008.) 
 
Categories. Industry & Commerce
 
First Hawaiian Printing Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, October 23, 2008
3. First Hawaiian Printing Marker
First Hawaiian Printing Marker at the Mission Houses Museum image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, October 23, 2008
4. First Hawaiian Printing Marker at the Mission Houses Museum
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on November 22, 2008, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,213 times since then and 28 times this year. Last updated on November 8, 2012. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on November 22, 2008, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia.   4. submitted on November 23, 2008, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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