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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Coupeville in Island County, Washington — The American West (Northwest)
 

Col. Isaac Neff Ebey – Rebecca Whitey Ebey

 
 
Col. Isaac Neff Ebey – Rebecca Whitey Ebey Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, October 31, 2012
1. Col. Isaac Neff Ebey – Rebecca Whitey Ebey Marker
Inscription.
In honor of the founder
of Island County and his wife
Col. Isaac Neff Ebey – Rebecca Whitey Ebey
1818 – 1857 1822-1858
Whidbey Island’s first permanent settler 1850.
Proposed the separation of Island County from Thurston County which was adopted on January 5, 1853.
Killed by the Haidah Indians Aug. 10, 1857
 
Erected by Citizens of Island County.
 
Location. 48° 13.1′ N, 122° 41.137′ W. Marker is in Coupeville, Washington, in Island County. Marker is on 7th Street NE. Touch for map. The Island County Courthouse is located on 7th Street NE between Main and Center Streets. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1 7th Street NE, Coupeville WA 98239, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Zylstra Law Office (approx. 0.2 miles away); Original Home of Seattle’s Best Coffee (approx. ¼ mile away); Keeping the Alexander Blockhouse alive!!! (approx. ¼ mile away); The Jolly Boat (approx. ¼ mile away); Remaining Blockhouses of Central Whidbey (approx. 1.3 miles away); Davis Blockhouse
Col. Isaac Neff Ebey – Rebecca Whitey Ebey Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, October 31, 2012
2. Col. Isaac Neff Ebey – Rebecca Whitey Ebey Marker
The marker is to the left of the entrance to the Island County Courthouse.
(approx. 1.3 miles away); Mary Barrett (approx. 1.3 miles away); Sunnyside (approx. 1.4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Coupeville.
 
Also see . . .
1. The Ebey Family - Sunnyside Cemetery. A recurring theme in the historical lore of Whidbey Island is the fate of Isaac Ebey's head following his murder. Numerous histories state that it was buried in Ebey's grave following its return to the family in 1860, but that is contrary to the evidence in Ebey family documents. All that is certain is that Ebey's scalp was returned to the family in 1860, an important matter for it brought them some semblance of closure after that horrific night of August 11, 1857. (Submitted on November 12, 2012, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.) 

2. Isaac N. Ebey - Wikipedia. In October 1850, Ebey moved from Olympia to Whidbey Island. When Congress passed the Donation Land Claim Act in 1850, Ebey claimed 640 acres (1.00 sq mi; 2.6 km2) for himself and his family overlooking Admiralty Inlet then wrote his wife to prepare for a move west with their sons. While awaiting their arrival, Ebey sent numerous letters to his relatives begging their relocation to Whidbey Island in order to snap up the best remaining land for homesteading and farming. (Submitted on November 12, 2012, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.) 
 
Categories. Settlements & Settlers
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on November 12, 2012, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. This page has been viewed 492 times since then and 33 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on November 12, 2012, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page.
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