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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Englishtown in Monmouth County, New Jersey — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Great Cannonade

 
 
The Great Cannonade Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 7, 2008
1. The Great Cannonade Marker
Inscription.
The Battle of Monmouth
28 June, 1778
1:15 PM – 5:30 PM

“… Shot and Shells flying as thick as Hail.”
Major General Nathanael Greene

For several long, hot and exhausting hours during the afternoon of June 28, 1778, the largest land artillery battle of the American Revolution raged. The climax of the battle took place here when, for almost three hours, ten Continental guns positioned on this hill fired upon then British guns located along the hedgerow on the hill in front of you.

The rain of shot and shell terrorized and astounded the infantry on both sides. Colonel Shreve, wrote “the cannonade was heavier than ever known in the field…. Cannon ball flew plentifully, and I cowardly dodged, which saved my head.”

While British shot spattered mud on General Washington’s uniform and his staff tried to get him to move, Washington calmly stood in his stirrups watching his artillery pound the Royal Highlanders.

The Continental artillery finally won the engagement when four additional guns were positioned on Combs Hill to attack the British left flank. Caught in the crossfire from the Continental guns, the British artillery withdrew, quickly followed by the British infantry.
 
Erected by Department of
The Great Cannonade Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bryan Olson, April 2007
2. The Great Cannonade Marker
Environmental Protection.
 
Location. 40° 16.805′ N, 74° 19.054′ W. Marker is in Englishtown, New Jersey, in Monmouth County. Touch for map. Marker is located on battlefield hiking trail. Marker is in this post office area: Englishtown NJ 07726, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. An Inspiring Commander in Chief (within shouting distance of this marker); Mary “Molly” Hays (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Battlefield Archaeology (about 400 feet away); Perrine Hill Spring (about 400 feet away); Molly Hays McCauley (about 400 feet away); Perrine Hill Front Line (about 600 feet away); Washington Resumes the Offensive (approx. 0.2 miles away); Highlanders Decline Combat (approx. 0.4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Englishtown.
 
More about this marker. The bottom of the marker features a photo of Mott’s Artillery taken at the 2002 reenactment. Next to this is a photo of a cannon firing, with the caption ”The dust and smoke would sometimes so shut out the view, that one could form no idea of what was going on – the roar of cannon, the crackling of musketry, men’s voices making horrible confusion; the groans and cries of the wounded.” Dr. William
Markers on Monmouth Battlefield image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 7, 2008
3. Markers on Monmouth Battlefield
There are two markers at this location on the Monmouth Battlefield.
Read

 
Also see . . .  The Spirit of ’Seventy-Six: The Story of the American Revolution As Told by Participants. 1957 book by Henry Steele Commager and Richard B. Morris. “One little incident happened during the heat of the cannonade, which I was eye-witness to, and which I think would be unpardonable not to mention. A woman whose husband belonged to the Artillery, and who was then attached to a piece in the engagement, attended with her husband at the piece the whole time. While in the act of reaching a cartridge and having one of her feet as far before the other as she could step, a cannon shot from the enemy passed directly between her legs without doing any other damage than carrying away all the lower part of her petticoat. Looking at it with apparent unconcern, she observed that it was lucky it did not pass a little higher, for in that case it might have carried away something else, and continued her occupation. —Narrative attributed to [Revolutionary War soldier] Joseph P. Martin.” (Submitted on March 15, 2008, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. War, US Revolutionary
 
The Hedgerow image. Click for full size.
By Bryan Olson, April 2007
4. The Hedgerow
This image was taken from the front of the marker.
The Battle of Monmouth 1:15 PM-5:30 PM image. Click for full size.
By Bryan Olson, circa April 2007
5. The Battle of Monmouth 1:15 PM-5:30 PM
Cannonade on the Monmouth Battlefield image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, June 15, 2013
6. Cannonade on the Monmouth Battlefield
American cannons prepare to fire on the British during the Battle of Monmouth reenactment.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on March 13, 2008, by Bryan Olson of Syracuse, New York. This page has been viewed 1,158 times since then and 55 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on July 7, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   2. submitted on March 13, 2008, by Bryan Olson of Syracuse, New York.   3. submitted on July 7, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   4, 5. submitted on March 13, 2008, by Bryan Olson of Syracuse, New York.   6. submitted on June 15, 2013, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. • J. J. Prats was the editor who published this page.
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