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The Tidal Basin in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Gift of Trees - The 1910 Shipment

 

—National Mall and Memorial Parks —

 
'The Gift of Trees - 1910 Shipment' Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, December 8, 2012
1. 'The Gift of Trees - 1910 Shipment' Marker
Inscription.
The Gift of Trees
Flowering cherry trees – which bloom profusely but do not bear edible fruit – were not common in the United States in 1900. American visitors to Japan found their beauty remarkable and journalist Eliza Scidmore was inspired to have these trees planted in Washington, D.C. She and David Fairchild, a botanist at the Department of Agriculture and plant explorer, were interested in beautifying the city’s landscape. In 1909, the project was endorsed at the highest level by First Lady Helen Herron Taft, who had seen photographs of the flowering trees from Japan. The first gift of trees from the city of Tokyo to the city of Washington, D.C. arrived the next year.

The 1910 Shipment
Two thousand cherry trees arrived in Washington, D.C. from Tokyo on January 6, 1910. U.S. Department of Agriculture scientists were becoming more aware of the danger posed by insects and pests imported from abroad. Insects and nematodes were found on the trees and the entire shipment had to be destroyed. A difficult diplomatic situation was avoided through the combined efforts of the U.S. State Department and Japanese authorities. On March 26, 1912, a new shipment of more than 3,000 healthy trees arrived. The first two trees were planted the next day.

[photo captions:]

The
The 'Gift of Trees - 1910 Shipment' Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, November 14, 2011
2. The 'Gift of Trees - 1910 Shipment' Marker
- note the barren limbs of the cherry trees in December.
1910 letter from the U.S. State Department to Japanese officials.

Burning the trees, 1910.

Elizabeth Scidmore
(1856-1928) had a career in journalism and a deep interest in Japanese culture. She promoted the planting of Japanese flowering cherry trees in Washington, D.C. for more than 20 years.

Dr. David Fairchild
(1869-1954), a U.S. Department of Agriculture botanist, oversaw the introduction of thousands of ornamental, food, and other plant species into the United States.

Yukio Ozaki
(1858-1954), Mayor of Tokyo at the time of the gift of cherry trees, was committed to advancing good relations between Japan and the United States.

Dr. Jokichi Takamine
(1854-1922), a distinguished chemist famous for the isolation of the hormone adrenaline and the first president of the pharmaceutical company Daiichi Sankyo, played a pivotal role in the city of Tokyo’s gift of trees to the city of Washington, D.C.

National Mall and Memorial Parks
National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior
 
Erected 2011 by National Park Service, U.S. Dept. of the Interior.
 
Location. 38° 53.105′ N, 77° 2.177′ W. Marker is in The Tidal Basin, District of Columbia, in Washington
The 'Gift of Trees /1910 Shipment' Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, November 14, 2011
3. The 'Gift of Trees /1910 Shipment' Marker
- on the Tidal Basin trail with the Thomas Jefferson Memorial in view to the south.
. Marker is on Tidal Basin Hiker-Biker Trail south of Maine Avenue, SW. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Washington DC 20024, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Keeping the Cherry Trees Healthy (about 700 feet away, measured in a direct line); The General Dwight David Eisenhower Plaza (approx. 0.2 miles away); Raoul Wallenberg Place (approx. ¼ mile away); Thomas Jefferson (approx. ¼ mile away); Escape Across the Potomac (approx. ¼ mile away); John Paul Jones Memorial (approx. 0.3 miles away); a different marker also named John Paul Jones Memorial (approx. 0.3 miles away); Japanese Stone Lantern - Lighting the Way (approx. 0.3 miles away).
 
Also see . . .  National Cherry Blossom Festival. (Submitted on December 13, 2012, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.)
 
Additional keywords. Cherry Blossom Festival; Tidal Basin; Thomas Jefferson Memorial.
 
Categories. Horticulture & ForestryNotable PersonsPeacePolitics
 
Cherry trees in bloom, Spring 2012 image. Click for full size.
By Grace C. Miller, circa March 2012
4. Cherry trees in bloom, Spring 2012
White blossoms on one of the "gift " cherry trees from Japan image. Click for full size.
By Grace C. Miller, March 2012
5. White blossoms on one of the "gift " cherry trees from Japan
Pink blossoms on another of the gift cherry trees from Japan image. Click for full size.
By Grace C. Miller, March 2012
6. Pink blossoms on another of the gift cherry trees from Japan
Japanese cherry trees in bloom on the Tidal Basin image. Click for full size.
By Grace C. Miller, March 2012
7. Japanese cherry trees in bloom on the Tidal Basin
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on February 4, 2017. This page originally submitted on December 13, 2012, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. This page has been viewed 530 times since then and 36 times this year. Last updated on December 14, 2012, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on December 13, 2012, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.   4. submitted on December 14, 2012, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.   5, 6, 7. submitted on December 15, 2012, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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