Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Cookeville in Putnam County, Tennessee — The American South (East South Central)
 

Town Spring

 
 
Town Spring Marker image. Click for full size.
By Tom Gillard, February 13, 2010
1. Town Spring Marker
Inscription. On July 2, 1855, Charles Crook sold forty acres of land to the Putnam County Court for $100. An uncovered spring, located approximately fifty feet northwest of the marker, became known as "The Town Spring" and was the determining factor in locating Cookeville as the county seat. This spring served as the source of water for many early residents.
 
Erected by Tennessee Historical Commission. (Marker Number 2D 40.)
 
Location. 36° 9.84′ N, 85° 30.09′ W. Marker is in Cookeville, Tennessee, in Putnam County. Marker is at the intersection of N. Dixie Ave and Freeze St, on the right when traveling north on N. Dixie Ave. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Cookeville TN 38501, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Putnam County Courthouses (about 700 feet away, measured in a direct line); Israel Putnam (approx. 0.2 miles away); Tennessee Central Depot (approx. 0.4 miles away); Dixie College (approx. 0.7 miles away); Walton Road - Old Burnt Stand (approx. one mile away); Old Salem Methodist Church
Town Spring Marker image. Click for full size.
By Tom Gillard, February 13, 2010
2. Town Spring Marker
(approx. 1.6 miles away); Steam Tractor 1886 (approx. 2.6 miles away); White Plains (approx. 3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Cookeville.
 
Additional comments.
1. End of the spring
“The spring continued to be used by local people even after they installed wells. In the 1960s, the spring was covered with asphalt to connect a road to the new Kuhn's Big K in Midtown Plaza.” —Images of America: Cookeville and Putnam County by Friends of the Cookeville History Museum
    — Submitted July 16, 2014, by Deanna Lack of Sparta, Tennessee.

 
Categories. Natural Resources
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on February 13, 2010, by Tom Gillard of Tullahoma, Tennessee. This page has been viewed 761 times since then and 19 times this year. Last updated on January 14, 2013, by Byron Hooks of Sandy Springs, Georgia. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on February 13, 2010, by Tom Gillard of Tullahoma, Tennessee. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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