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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Bellaire in Harris County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Bellaire Streetcar Line

 
 
Bellaire Streetcar Line Marker image. Click for full size.
By Jim Evans, March 17, 2013
1. Bellaire Streetcar Line Marker
Inscription. In 1909 the Westmoreland Railroad Company, directed by Bellaire developer William Wright Baldwin, began construction of a streetcar line between this site and Houston's Main Street (4 mi. E) to improve transportation between Bellaire and Houston. Laid out on the esplanade of Bellaire Boulevard, the streetcar line consisted of one railway track and an overhead electric wire. The line terminated at this site, where the company constructed a waiting pavilion and a turnaround loop. At the same time, the Houston Electric Company extended its south end line from Eagle Avenue down present Fannin Street to connect with the Bellaire line at Bellaire Boulevard (now part of Holcombe Boulevard). The trip between Bellaire and downtown Houston required one transfer at Eagle Avenue. Service began on December 28, 1910.

The streetcar line, often called the “Toonerville Trolley,” became an integral link between Bellaire and Houston and played a vital role in the development of this area. The availability of motor transport and frequent derailments caused by worn-out track led to the abandonment of the line on September 26, 1927. Motor bus service began the following day.
 
Erected 1993 by Texas Historical Commission. (Marker Number 10616.)
 
Location.
Streetcar image. Click for full size.
By Jim Evans, March 17, 2013
2. Streetcar
29° 42.349′ N, 95° 28.042′ W. Marker is in Bellaire, Texas, in Harris County. Marker is at the intersection of Bellaire Boulevard and 3rd Street, on the left when traveling west on Bellaire Boulevard. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Bellaire TX 77401, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 5 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Bellaire Presbyterian Church (within shouting distance of this marker); Texan Capture of Mexican Dispatches (approx. 0.2 miles away); Bellaire (approx. 0.2 miles away); Forum of Civics of River Oaks Garden Club (approx. 3.9 miles away); Holcombe House (approx. 4.6 miles away); Holland Lodge No. 1 (approx. 4.9 miles away); St. Paul's United Methodist Church (approx. 4.9 miles away); First Presbyterian Church of Houston (approx. 4.9 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Bellaire.
 
Also see . . .  A Webpage With Pictures of the Streetcar. (Submitted on March 18, 2013, by Jim Evans of Houston, Texas.)
 
Categories. Railroads & Streetcars
 
Streetcar & Markers image. Click for full size.
By Jim Evans
3. Streetcar & Markers
Trolley Dedication Day, 1910 image. Click for full size.
By Jim Evans, March 17, 2013
4. Trolley Dedication Day, 1910
The trolley has become the unofficial symbol of Bellaire. Dubbed the "Toonerville Trolley" after a popular newspaper cartoon, it traveled across six miles of prairie bringing residents to high school, work, and the shopping mecca of Downtown Houston. The trolley ran from 1910 until 1927.
Bellaire Trolley Station and Pavilion, 1911 image. Click for full size.
By Jim Evans, March 17, 2013
5. Bellaire Trolley Station and Pavilion, 1911
Folks could wait for or disembark from the trolley at the Trolley Pavilion, but they also gathered there for picnics, Church school, and a variety of community activities. A replica of the Pavilion, constructed by the Bellaire Historical Society, was located at S. Rice & Bellaire from 2000 to 2008.
Marker Sponsors image. Click for full size.
By Jim Evans, March 17, 2013
6. Marker Sponsors
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on March 18, 2013, by Jim Evans of Houston, Texas. This page has been viewed 352 times since then and 36 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on March 18, 2013, by Jim Evans of Houston, Texas. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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