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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Santa Fe in Santa Fe County, New Mexico — The American Mountains (Southwest)
 

The Spitz Clock

 
 
The Spitz Clock Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, May 1, 2013
1. The Spitz Clock Marker
Inscription. The Spitz Jewelry Store was established on the Plaza in 1881, and a clock, without works, was placed in front of the store to advertise the wares offered. Near the turn of the century, this “clock” was replaced by a functioning sidewalk clock which stood until 1915, when it was knocked down by one of the first motor trucks in Santa Fe. The third Spitz clock, standing here, was purchased second-hand by Salamon Spitz in 1916 and was brought to Santa Fe from Kansas City. It stood in front of the Spitz Jewelry Store until the Plaza’s south portal was built in 1967. The clock was donated to the citizens of Santa Fe by Bernard Spitz, and was erected on this site in June of 1974.
 
Location. 35° 41.277′ N, 105° 56.335′ W. Marker is in Santa Fe, New Mexico, in Santa Fe County. Marker is at the intersection of West Palace Street and Lincoln Avenue, on the left when traveling west on West Palace Street. Touch for map. It is the edge of the plaza, next to the New Mexico Museum of Art. Marker is in this post office area: Santa Fe NM 87501, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Santa Fe Plaza (within shouting distance of this marker); El Palacio Real (within shouting distance of this marker); Annexation of New Mexico
The Spitz Clock and Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, May 1, 2013
2. The Spitz Clock and Marker
Santa Fe Plaza is in the distance.
(within shouting distance of this marker); To the Heroes (within shouting distance of this marker); U.S.S. Santa Fe CL-60 (within shouting distance of this marker); La Castrense (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Site of Santa Fe’s First Chapel (about 400 feet away); End of Santa Fe Trail (about 400 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Santa Fe.
 
Regarding The Spitz Clock. From a 2010 article by Julia Ann Grimm in the Santa Fe New Mexican. “ ‘The clock is a rare and wonderful part of the city’s history,’ said Michael Cochran, a gilder who restored gold leaf on the clock’s body about 17 years ago and will take up the task again sometime after Fiesta de Santa Fe. ‘The reason it is such a beautiful piece is because Howard Clock Company in Boston was known for their pocket watches and their monument clocks,’ he said. ‘This is an example of a pocket watch sculpture on a monument clock. And also it’s the only one left in public that has the original workings’.”
 
Categories. Landmarks
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on May 1, 2013, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page has been viewed 380 times since then and 36 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on May 1, 2013, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia.
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