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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Gaithersburg in Montgomery County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Grusendorf Log House

 
 
Grusendorf Log House Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, October 2, 2011
1. Grusendorf Log House Marker
Inscription. The Grusendorf Log House is one of a few remaining pre-Civil War structures in the Germantown/Gaithersburg area.

The Cabin was relocated to its present site next to the Seneca Creek State Park Visitor Center in the 1990s to preserve it from encroaching development. Its original location was on Clopper Road, just west of Great Seneca Highway.

Simple Lifestyles
One room housed the whole family. The loft was used for sleeping. Family activities centered around the hearth. The house was lighted by only two windows, making it dark and dreary in the winter.

Notice that there is no landscaping. That was a luxury for which early settlers has no extra time. Their time was devoted to the essentials of life.

Although the log house is no longer part of "Old Germantown," its preservation will always allow us to imagine the past, and the German immigrants who settled at the crossroads of Clopper Road and Route 118. Today, on its new site, the log house is used for historical educational programs.

Utilizing Local Materials
Jacob Snyder, a German immigrant, built the house in 1855. In 1860, he sold it to Franz and Hanna Grusendorf. Franz Grusendorf was a stone mason who built the foundations and walls of many houses and farm buildings of the time in the Germantown area.

The
Grusendorf Log House Marker in front the Log House image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, October 2, 2011
2. Grusendorf Log House Marker in front the Log House
Grusendorf house is typical of early 19th century homes built by German farmers who settled in the region. The cabin has V-notched logs which once chinked with fieldstone and clay (however the preserved structure utilizes a formula that includes modern day concrete.)

The original fieldstone foundation was from local fieldstone. Like most log houses of the time, it had lapped siding mad of milled wooden boards. When siding was not available -- or affordable -- exposed logs were whitewashed using a paint based on lime, for protection from weather and insects.
 
Location. 39° 8.901′ N, 77° 15.024′ W. Marker is in Gaithersburg, Maryland, in Montgomery County. Marker can be reached from Seneca Creek Road. Touch for map. The marker is in Seneca Creek State Park near the Visitor's Center. Marker is in this post office area: Gaithersburg MD 20878, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. The Woodlands (within shouting distance of this marker); Middlebrook Mills (approx. 1.7 miles away); Liberty Mill (approx. 2.1 miles away); Reflections of Old Germantown (approx. 2.1 miles away); Chestnut/Meem Historic District (approx.
Grusendorf Log House image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, March 11, 2006
3. Grusendorf Log House
2.5 miles away); The Thomas Cannery (approx. 2.6 miles away); Second Lieutenant William J. Christman, III (approx. 2.8 miles away); The Chandler Wobble (approx. 2.9 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Gaithersburg.
 
Categories. Notable BuildingsSettlements & Settlers
 
Utilizing Local Materials image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, March 11, 2006
4. Utilizing Local Materials
Close-up of images on maker
Grusendorf Log House at The Woodlands image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, March 11, 2006
5. Grusendorf Log House at The Woodlands
V-notched corners and Concrete Chinking image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, March 11, 2006
6. V-notched corners and Concrete Chinking
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on November 27, 2013, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page has been viewed 461 times since then and 52 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on November 27, 2013, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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