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Coloma in El Dorado County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

200th Anniversary of James W. Marshall's Birth

 
 
200th Anniversary of James W. Marshall's Birth Marker image. Click for full size.
By James King, January 24, 2014
1. 200th Anniversary of James W. Marshall's Birth Marker
Inscription. On the occasion of James W. Marshall's 200th birthday, the Native Sons of the Golden West rededicate this monument erected in his honor. Born in Hopewell Township, Mercer County, New Jersey to Phillip and Sarah Wilson Marshall on October 8, 1810, he was the oldest of four children and the only male. He arrived in California via Oregon in 1845 where he worked for John Sutter before acquiring a small cattle ranch. In 1846 he served with John C. Fremont during the Bear Flag Revolt. Marshall partnered with Sutter to construct a sawmill where he made the discovery that would cause the cry of "GOLD" to reverberate around the world.

After his discovery of gold in 1848 Marshall found some success operating a ferry, hotel and a vineyard but by the 1860s fell on hard times and relocated to Kelsey. At the time of his death August 10th, 1885 Marshall was penniless, living in a small cabin. His body was brought to Coloma for burial. Immediately thereafter, Placerville Parlor #9 of the Native Sons of the Golden West in 1887 successfully advocated for the construction of the monument you see here today, the first such monument erected in California. Re-dedicated October 8, 2010
By Grand Parlor
Native Sons of the Golden West
James L. Shadle, Grand President
 
Erected 2010 by Grand Parlor,
NSGW Presidents and 200th Anniversary of James W. Marshall's Birth Monument image. Click for full size.
By James King, January 24, 2014
2. NSGW Presidents and 200th Anniversary of James W. Marshall's Birth Monument
(l-r) NSGW Grand President Dwight Dutschke 2013-2014
Past Grand President(PGP) David Allen 2011-2012
PGP Barney Noel 2004-2005
PGP James Schadle 2010-2011 and
PGP Harly Harty 1992-1993
Native Sons of the Golden West. (Marker Number 2010-03.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Native Sons/Daughters of the Golden West marker series.
 
Location. 38° 47.807′ N, 120° 53.657′ W. Marker is in Coloma, California, in El Dorado County. Marker can be reached from Marshall Park Way (California Route 153). Touch for map. This marker is a few yards from the James W. Marshall monument. A short drive up Marshall Park Way from State Highway 49 leads to a parking lot. The monument is a short walk up the steps at the back of the parking lot. Marker is in this post office area: Coloma CA 95613, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. James W. Marshall (within shouting distance of this marker); Cabin of James Marshall (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Mining Ditches (about 400 feet away); Saint John’s Cemetery (about 500 feet away); Emmanuel Church (approx. 0.2 miles away); El Dorado County Jails (approx. ¼ mile away); Sutter Mill Cemetery – 1848 (approx. ¼ mile away); Pioneer Cemetery (approx. ¼ mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Coloma.
 
More about this marker. The marker is located within the boundaries of the Marshall Gold Discovery State Historic
Location of 200th Anniversary of James W. Marshall's Birth Marker... image. Click for full size.
By James King, January 24, 2014
3. Location of 200th Anniversary of James W. Marshall's Birth Marker...
...relative to Marshall Monument, beyond flagpole.

Today's Native Sons studying the work of their forefathers.
Park. Marshall Park Way (California 153) is California's shortest state highway.
 
Also see . . .
1. James Marshall: California's Gold Discoverer. If luck were a critical factor in the discovery of gold that initiated the California Gold Rush, probably the unluckiest man of that period was no other than the original discoverer himself, James Wilson Marshall. Few people know about Marshall's ironically tragic life after he made his great discovery, from which he did not profit; he died with assets barely sufficient to cover his funeral expenses. (Submitted on February 1, 2014, by James King of San Miguel, California.) 

2. James Wilson Marshall. Born in Lambertsville, New Jersey, on October 8 of 1810, James Marshall left home for good at the young age of twenty-four. Missouri was his first stop; there he settled down along the banks of the Missouri River and took to farming. Several years later he caught one of the malarial fevers that plagued the residents of the low-lying bottom lands. His recovery was slow but when he felt well enough to travel, he decided it was time to head west to seek a healthier climate. Joining an emigrant train on its way to the Oregon Territory in 1844, Marshall was not content with his destination and upon arriving decided to set out once again, this time for California. He arrived at Sutter’s Fort in 1845, at the age of thirty-four, and was immediately hired as a handyman
Native Sons of the Golden West image. Click for full size.
By James King, January 24, 2014
4. Native Sons of the Golden West
(l-r) Tony Starelli, Fairfax Parlor #307,
Grand President Dwight Dutschke, Ione Parlor #33
PGP David Allen, Auburn Parlor #59
PGP Barney Noel, Placerville Parlor #9
Grand Trustee James King, San Miguel Parlor #150
PGP James Schadle, Georgetown Parlor #91
Grand Trustee Joe Castillo, Rio Hondo Parlor #294
Val Rendon, Georgetown Parlor #91
by Captain Sutter. Anxious to get back to farming, Marshall bought a ranch on Butte Creek but continued to work for Sutter.
(Submitted on February 1, 2014, by James King of San Miguel, California.) 

3. James W. Marshall's account of the first discovery of the Gold. Being a millwright by trade, as there was a ready cash sale for lumber, I concluded to seek a location in the mountains and erect a mill, to supply the valley with lumber. Some time in April, 1847, I visited New Helvetia, commonly known as the "Fort" where I made my resolution known to John A. Sutter, sen., and requested of him an Indian boy, to act as an interpreter to the mountain Indians in the vicinity of the American river or Rio del los Americanos, as it was then called. At first he refused, because, he said that he had previously sent several companies, at various times and by different routes, for that purpose, all of whom reported that it was impossible to find a route for a wagon road to any locality where pine timber could be procured, and that it was the height of folly to attempt any such thing.

Capt. Sutter at length, however, promised me the desired interpreter, provided I would stock some six or eight plows for him first, of which he was in immediate want, which I readily agreed to do. While I was employed upon this job there was much talk at the Fort concerning my contemplated
James Marshall Monument & Native Sons of the Golden West image. Click for full size.
By James King, January 24, 2014
5. James Marshall Monument & Native Sons of the Golden West
(l-r) PGP Barney Noel, Placerville Parlor #9 (in back)
SDDGP Steve Wong (with friend), Sunset Parlor #26
Tony Starelli, Fairfax Parlor #307
PGP James Shadle, Val Rendon & Warren Trueblood, all three from Georgetown Parlor #91
PGP David Allen, Auburn Parlor #59 (in back) and
Karen Shadle
trip to the mountains; and Messrs. Gingery, P.L. Wimmer and McLellan having resolved also to take a trip with the same object in view, came where I was working and asked me where I expected to find a road and timber, and I promptly gave them my views and directions.
(Submitted on February 1, 2014, by James King of San Miguel, California.) 
 
Categories. Notable Persons
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on January 30, 2014, by James King of San Miguel, California. This page has been viewed 467 times since then and 51 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on January 30, 2014, by James King of San Miguel, California.   2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on January 31, 2014, by James King of San Miguel, California. • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page.
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