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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Northeast in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Education for All

Hub, Home, Heart

 

—Greater H Street NE Heritage Trail —

 
Education for All Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 29, 2012
1. Education for All Marker
Inscription. Gallaudet University is world renowned as the premier institution for higher education for deaf and hard of hearing students. It opened as the Columbia Institution for the Instruction of the Deaf and Dumb and Blind in 1856 on land donated by former Postmaster General Amos Kendall. In 1864 Congress chartered its collegiate program, which President Abraham Lincoln signed into law. The school's current name honors Thomas Hopkins Gallaudet, founder of the first school for the deaf in the United States and father of the university's first president, Edward Miner Gallaudet.

Gallaudet was designated a university in 1986. Two years later the university selected its first deaf president after students, supported by faculty, staff, alumni, the national deaf community, and national leaders, demanded a "Deaf President Now!" Their effort launched a movement leading to important laws expanding access to communications, including the landmark Americans with Disabilities Act in 1990. Gallaudet students study in both American Sign Language and English at the university recognized as the center of American Deaf Culture.

"Gallaudet College" is a National Historic Landmark, and the original campus (1866-1878) is in the National Register of Historic Places.

Just east of the Gallaudet campus is the Trinidad neighborhood, named for the
Gallaudet Campus image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 29, 2012
2. Gallaudet Campus
Left and Center: Gallaudet's College Hall, left, and Chapel Hall, seen around 1940. At right is Postmaster General Amos Kendall, who donated land for the campus, known to this day as Kendall Green.

Right: Amos Kendall's mansion, left, served as Gallaudet's farmhouse when the college kept a farm here, 1940.
former estate of DC banker and philanthropist William Wilson Corcoran (1798-1888). Among Corcoran's legacies to his city are the former Riggs Bank, Oak Hill Cemetery, and the Corcoran Gallery of Art. In 1875 Corcoran donated Trinidad to Columbian College (George Washington University's predecessor), which sold it to Washington Brick Machine Company. Washington Brick eventually sold its property for housing lots.

(Back):
Trains and streetcars created the Near Northeast neighborhood around H Street. The B&O Railroad's arrival in 1835 made this a center of energetic, working-class life. Workmen living north of the Capitol staffed the Government Printing Office, ran the trains, stocked the warehouses, and built Union Station. When a streetcar arrived linking H Street to downtown, new construction quickly followed.

H Street bustled with shops and offices run by Jewish, Italian, Lebanese, Greek, Irish, and African American families. During the segregation era, which lasted into the 1950s, African Americans came to H Street for its department stores and sit-down restaurants. Most businesses welcomed all customers.

Then came the civil disturbances in the wake of the Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s assassination in 1968. Decades of commercial decline followed. Just off H Street, though, the strong residential community endured. The 2005 opening of
Sign Language image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 29, 2012
3. Sign Language
Top: Gallaudet football players in a huddle, around 1950. Gallaudet players invented the huddle in 1894 to shield their sign language from opponents' view.

Bottom: Dina Toulan, left, and Christine Grymes practice signing with teaching assistant Jum Reilley in Gallaudet's summer day care center, 1988.
the Atlas Performing Arts Center signaled a revival, building evocatively on H Street's past. Hub, Home, Heart is a bridge to carry you from that past to the present.

Hub, Home, Heart: Greater H Street NE Heritage Trail is an Official Washington, DC Walking Trail. The self-guided, 3.2-mile tour of 18 signs offers about two hours of gentle exercise. Free keepsake guidebooks in English or Spanish are available at businesses and institutions along the way. For more on DC neighborhoods, please visit www.CulturalTourismDC.org.
 
Erected 2012 by Cultural Tourism DC. (Marker Number 8.)
 
Location. 38° 54.283′ N, 76° 59.676′ W. Marker is in Near Northeast, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker is at the intersection of Florida Avenue, NE and 8th Street, NE, on the right when traveling west on Florida Avenue, NE. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Washington DC 20002, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Leonard M. Elstad (within shouting distance of this marker); Thomas Hopkins Gallaudet (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Laurent Clerc (about 300 feet away); Chapel Hall
Gallaudet Pharmacy image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 29, 2012
4. Gallaudet Pharmacy
Gallaudet students at Gallaudet Pharmacy at West Virginia and Florida Aves., 1950s.
(about 400 feet away); Site of the Rose Cottage (about 500 feet away); Edward Miner Gallaudet (about 600 feet away); Brickyards to Buildings (about 700 feet away); "Ole Jim" (approx. 0.2 miles away).
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. Greater H Street NE Heritage Trail
 
Categories. Education
 
Back of Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 29, 2012
5. Back of Marker
Student Protests image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 29, 2012
6. Student Protests
Students demand a deaf president for Gallaudet University, 1988.
Map of the H Street Heritage Trail image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 29, 2012
7. Map of the H Street Heritage Trail
Education for All Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 29, 2012
8. Education for All Marker
Gallaudet University Entrance image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 29, 2012
9. Gallaudet University Entrance
Fowler Hall image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 29, 2012
10. Fowler Hall
Gallaudet Pharmacy Today image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 29, 2012
11. Gallaudet Pharmacy Today
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on October 6, 2012, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 366 times since then and 32 times this year. Last updated on February 11, 2014, by A. Taylor of Laurel, Maryland. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11. submitted on October 6, 2012, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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