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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Honolulu in Honolulu County, Hawaii — Hawaiian Island Archipelago (Pacific Ocean)
 

Kaha ha ʻlo me nā Makani

“The Hawk Soars with the Winds”

 

—by sculptor, Kim Duffett —

 
The Hawk Soars with the Winds Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, October 23, 2008
1. The Hawk Soars with the Winds Marker
Inscription. Envisioned on a grand scale, these three awe-inspiring figures in bronze are dancing hula kahiko, the ancient style of Hawaiian dance. The two female dancers, spirits of the wind, represent the dance and chant of Hawaiian hula. Together they are the winds that uplift the mighty ’lo, the Hawaiian hawk, our central male dancer, who represents the spirit of Hawai‘i poised to take flight. These images pay tribute to the importance of dance, chant and song in the rebirth and growth of Hawaiian culture. Together they celebrate the power of the hula connecting us with the spirit of the land, the ‘Āina, that is our Hawaii.

Kū Makani — “Rising Wind”. Coiled to face the gusting wind, the dance in the ‘ai ha ‘a (bent knee) position is power and grace in motion. She steadies herself and squints into the wind defiantly instead of turning her face away, her pā‘u flying.

Kaha ka ‘lo — “The Hawk Soars”. The highest chiefs were often called ‘lo, hawk with eyes that can see everywhere on the land. The male dancer’s strong clean lines focus up toward the heavens, towards a future of great aspirations. Carried by the winds on either side of him, he soars ever higher.

Ka Leo o Haukani
The Hawk Soars with the Winds image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, October 23, 2008
2. The Hawk Soars with the Winds
The marker is out of frame at the feet of the photographer, who is standing on the sidewalk with his back to the intersection.
— “The Voice of the Wind”.
The dancer, in hula noho (sitting) position, braces herself against a powerful wind, her hands moving as if to pull the wind over her. winds are seen as voices of the ancestors. Listen and they will speak to you. Hula noho is often done with the dancer chanting during the dance.
 
Erected by Hilton Hawaiian Village Beach Resort & Spa.
 
Location. 21° 17.078′ N, 157° 50.154′ W. Marker is in Honolulu, Hawaii, in Honolulu County. Marker is at the intersection of Ala Moana Boulevard (Hawaii Route 92) and Kalia Road, on the right on Ala Moana Boulevard. Touch for map. It is at the entrance to the Hilton Hawaiian Village in Waikiki. Marker is in this post office area: Honolulu HI 96815, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Story of Kālia (within shouting distance of this marker); Rainbow Mural (approx. 0.2 miles away); Fort DeRussy (approx. 0.2 miles away); Kuroda Field (approx. 0.2 miles away); Kālia Bay (approx. 0.2 miles away); Duke Kahanamoku (approx. ¼ mile away); Rainbow Tower & Hilton Lagoon (approx. ¼ mile away); Kãlia Fishponds (approx. 0.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Honolulu.
 
More about this marker.
Kaha ha ‘lo me nā Makani - The Hawk Soar with the Winds image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, October 23, 2008
3. Kaha ha ‘lo me nā Makani - The Hawk Soar with the Winds
2001 bronze sculpture by Hawaii artist Kim Duffett. The male dancer measures 15 feet from tip to toe.
A duplicate of the marker sits to the right of the sculpture, facing the walk that runs behind the sculpture.
 
Also see . . .
1. A New Landmark is Unveiled at the Gateway to Waikiki and Hilton Hawaiian Village. 2001 article in Business Wire. “Kaha Ka `Io Me Na Makani has been a monumental undertaking. After consulting with University of Hawaii’s Hawaiian Studies department, Duffett began designing the sculpture. He began work in August 1999, and for several months had to relocate to Ashland, Ore., and San Francisco Bay area because his Hawaii studio could not accommodate the project.” (Submitted on November 1, 2008.) 

2. Bronze Age – Sculptor’s work reflects the many cultures he has encountered. 2003 article by Nancy Arcayna in the Honolulu Star Bulletin. Includes a photo of the scupltor. (Submitted on November 1, 2008.) 
 
Additional keywords. Waikiki, aina, pau
 
Categories. Arts, Letters, Music
 
Kū Makani — “Rising Wind” image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, October 23, 2008
4. Kū Makani — “Rising Wind”
Kaha ka ‘lo — “The Hawk Soars” image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, October 23, 2008
5. Kaha ka ‘lo — “The Hawk Soars”
Ka Leo o Haukani — “The Voice of the Wind” image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, October 23, 2008
6. Ka Leo o Haukani — “The Voice of the Wind”
Ka Leo o Haukani — “The Voice of the Wind” image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, October 23, 2008
7. Ka Leo o Haukani — “The Voice of the Wind”
Kū Makani — “Rising Wind” image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, October 23, 2008
8. Kū Makani — “Rising Wind”
“The Voice of the Wind and “The Hawk Soars” image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, October 23, 2008
9. “The Voice of the Wind and “The Hawk Soars”
Kaha ha ‘lo me nā Makani — “The Hawk Soar with the Winds” image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, October 23, 2008
10. Kaha ha ‘lo me nā Makani — “The Hawk Soar with the Winds”
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on November 1, 2008, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page has been viewed 2,027 times since then and 45 times this year. Last updated on February 22, 2014, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10. submitted on November 1, 2008, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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