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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Buffalo in Erie County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Buffalo Zoo

Growing with the City

 
 
Buffalo Zoo Marker image. Click for full size.
By Anton Schwarzmueller, July 4, 2014
1. Buffalo Zoo Marker
Inscription. Menagerie to Habitat. The Buffalo Zoo, like other modern zoos, has become an educational facility that focuses on conservation and reproduction of endangered species. The Zoo has reintroduced some endangered animals to their native habitats. Today's institution represents a big change from early times when zoos were collections of unusual animals often kept in poor conditions.

1875 Elam R. Jewett (Buffalo and Erie County Historical Society) Owned the land at the corner of Jewett and Parkside Avenues that became the Buffalo Zoo. The Buffalo Zoo was started when two deer were donated to the city and Mr. Jewett agreed to house them on his spacious grounds. Soon they were joined by a flock of sheep, put there to keep the meadow mowed, and bison, elk and a cow.

1930s (Buffalo and Erie County Historical Society) The Works Progress Administration renovated the Zoo, building many of the natural stone structures that contributed to Delaware Park's nomination to the National Register of Historic Places.

Francis Crandall (Buffalo and Erie County Historical Society). Curator for 36 years, Crandall brought Big Frank, the elephant, to the Zoo and built the Elephant house that still stands today.

An Olmsted Park. The zoo is located in Delaware Park, a park designed by Frederick Law Olmsted. For more on Olmsted, look for other

Southward View Buffalo Zoo Marker image. Click for full size.
By Anton Schwarzmueller, July 4, 2014
2. Southward View Buffalo Zoo Marker
Seaway Trail panels in Delaware Park.

2002. The Buffalo Zoo developed an exciting master plan to completely transform the Zoo with major new exhibits and visitor facilities. The core experience of the new zoo will be a series of realistic, immersive animal enclosures that take visitors on a journey around the world.

World of Water. The major organizing theme of the new zoo is "water." This theme was chosen because of water's historic importance to the City of Buffalo. The new exhibits enhance appreciation for animals, and their behaviors. Visitors will learn that all living plants, animals, and human cultures share the same world of water.

Zoo Timeline
2002 Plans are developed for major new exhibits with theme of water.
1980s Emphasis changes from numbers of animals to breeding and reproduction.
1973 Zoological Society takes over zoo operations.
1960s Gorillas arrive, Children's Zoo, Giraffe House, and Animal Hospital open.
1942 Reptile House opened and declared finest in America.
1938 Marlin Perkins hired as Curator, serves until 1944.
1935 Works Progress Administration begins zoo redevelopment.
1931 Zoological Society incorporated in midst of Great Depression.
1912 Elephant House built for Big Frank.
1901 First Elephant, Big Frank, arrives in time for Pan-American Exhibition.
1898

Westward View Buffalo Zoo Marker image. Click for full size.
By Anton Schwarzmueller, July 4, 2014
3. Westward View Buffalo Zoo Marker
Francis Crandall is hired as Curator.
1895 First Zoo Curator, Frank J. Thompson, is hired, serves until 1898.
1890 Bear pits created. Public awareness grows, many animals donated.
1875 First permanent building. Buffalo Zoological Gardens established.
1870 A pair of deer presented to the City of Buffalo.

Cultural Heritage. Cultural Institutions were born along with Seaway Trail cities.
Seaway Trail, Inc. Corner Ray & West Main St., Sackets Harbor, NY 13685. www.seawaytrail.com America's Byways. This project was funded in part by the Federal Highway Administration and Administered by the New York State Scenic Byways Program of the New York State Department of Transportation and Seaway Trail, Inc.
 
Erected by Seaway Trail, Inc.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Great Lakes Seaway Trail National Scenic Byway marker series.
 
Location. 42° 56.161′ N, 78° 51.066′ W. Marker is in Buffalo, New York, in Erie County. Marker is at the intersection of Parkside Avenue and Jewett Parkway, on the right when traveling south on Parkside Avenue. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Buffalo NY 14214, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. An Architectural Treasure
Northward View Buffalo Zoo Marker image. Click for full size.
By Anton Schwarzmueller, July 4, 2014
4. Northward View Buffalo Zoo Marker
(about 700 feet away, measured in a direct line); Frank Lloyd Wright's Martin House Complex (about 700 feet away); The Flint Hill Encampment (approx. 0.2 miles away); Unnamed Soldiers of the War of 1812 (approx. 0.2 miles away); Central Presbyterian Church (approx. 0.4 miles away); Flint Hill Encampment 1812 (approx. half a mile away); Albert James Myer, M.D. (approx. 0.7 miles away); Ebenezer Walden (approx. 0.7 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Buffalo.
 
Also see . . .
1. Buffalo Zoo. (Submitted on July 5, 2014, by Anton Schwarzmueller of Wilson, New York.)
2. Buffalo Zoo - Wikipedia. Third oldest zoo in the U.S. (Submitted on July 5, 2014, by Anton Schwarzmueller of Wilson, New York.) 

3. Seaway Trail. (Submitted on July 5, 2014, by Anton Schwarzmueller of Wilson, New York.)
 
Categories. AnimalsCharity & Public WorkEducation
 
Buffalo Zoo Marker and Parking Lot image. Click for full size.
By Anton Schwarzmueller, July 4, 2014
5. Buffalo Zoo Marker and Parking Lot
Zoo Entrance in backgound
View from Parking Lot Buffalo Zoo Marker image. Click for full size.
By Anton Schwarzmueller, July 4, 2014
6. View from Parking Lot Buffalo Zoo Marker
Map Buffalo Zoo Marker image. Click for full size.
By Anton Schwarzmueller
7. Map Buffalo Zoo Marker
Location of Zoo marker, Flint Hill Marker, and Old Fountain written in.
Map of Buffalo Zoo image. Click for full size.
By Anton Schwarzmueller
8. Map of Buffalo Zoo
Flint Hill Marker, Old Fountain, Lion/Tiger Dedication Plaque, Vet Plaque written in.
Buffalo Zoo Old Fountain Plaque image. Click for full size.
By Anton Schwarzmueller, July 4, 2014
9. Buffalo Zoo Old Fountain Plaque
This fovntain is lovingly dedicated to the memory of Esther Taylor Wettlavfer 1902-1914. "My little sisters, the birds. God feedeth you, and giveth you the streams and fountains for your drink."
Buffalo Zoo Old Fountain image. Click for full size.
By Anton Schwarzmueller, July 4, 2014
10. Buffalo Zoo Old Fountain
Buffalo Zoo Main Fountain Plaza image. Click for full size.
By Anton Schwarzmueller, July 4, 2014
11. Buffalo Zoo Main Fountain Plaza
Gorillas at left. Lion/Tiger Plaque at Center (obscured).
Buffalo Zoo Gorilla Entrance image. Click for full size.
By Anton Schwarzmueller, July 4, 2014
12. Buffalo Zoo Gorilla Entrance
Old doors and stonework lead to a connecting new building.
Buffalo Zoo Lion/Tiger Plaque image. Click for full size.
By Anton Schwarzmueller, July 4, 2014
13. Buffalo Zoo Lion/Tiger Plaque
Buffalo Zoo Veterinarian Plaque image. Click for full size.
By Anton Schwarzmueller, July 4, 2014
14. Buffalo Zoo Veterinarian Plaque
Frank E. McClelland, Sr. Veterinary Hospital. The Zoo. Dedicated in memory of Frank E. McClelland, Sr., D.V.M. in recognition of devoted service as Buffalo Zoo Veterinarian, 1914 - 1963. Plaque is fenced from public domain.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on July 5, 2014, by Anton Schwarzmueller of Wilson, New York. This page has been viewed 363 times since then and 80 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14. submitted on July 5, 2014, by Anton Schwarzmueller of Wilson, New York. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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