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Demarest in Bergen County, New Jersey — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Demarest Railroad Station

 
 
Demarest Railroad Station image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, May 1, 2008
1. Demarest Railroad Station
Inscription. Built 1872 at “Demarests Station” on the Northern Railroad of New Jersey. Designed by noted architect J. Cleveland Cady, it was considered the “handsomest on the line.” The depot was built of Palisades stone quarried on the Demarest farm. The station was named for State Senator Ralph S. Demarest, a director of the railroad, and his family, who owned the land. The Borough took the name when incorporated in 1903.

Sponsored by Demarest Historical Association 1980.
 
Erected 1980 by Bergen County Historical Society. (Marker Number 67.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the New Jersey, Bergen County Historical Society marker series.
 
Location. 40° 57.403′ N, 73° 57.795′ W. Marker is in Demarest, New Jersey, in Bergen County. Marker is on Park Street, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Demarest NJ 07627, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Douwe Talema (approx. 0.4 miles away); Sautes Tave’s Begraven Ground (approx. 0.4 miles away); The Closter Horseman (approx. ¾ mile away); Walter Parcells Homestead
Park Street Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, May 1, 2008
2. Park Street Marker
(approx. 0.8 miles away); Closter Public School (approx. one mile away); Benjamin P. Westervelt Homesite (approx. one mile away); Schraalenburgh Road (approx. 1.1 miles away); Reformed Church of Closter (approx. 1.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Demarest.
 
Also see . . .
1. Bergen County Historical Society. (Submitted on May 1, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.)
2. The Northern Railroad of New Jersey. 1859 article in the New York Times (Submitted on May 25, 2008.) 
 
Additional comments.
1. Passenger Service Through Demarest
The occasional freight is all that rumbles on the track past the Demarest railroad station today, but for more than 100 years until the early 1960s, numerous passenger trains stopped here on their way to and from Jersey City. By the 1940s the Erie Railroad ran the line, and they were all commuter trains ferrying folks to their jobs in New York City. At the bustling Jersey City terminal, a ferry completed the commute across the Hudson River to a dock at Chambers Street.

The Northern Railroad of New Jersey ran between Nyack in New York and Jersey City, a distance
Demarest Railroad Station and Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, May 1, 2008
3. Demarest Railroad Station and Marker
The Demarest Railroad Station is on the List of Registered Historic Places in Bergen County, New Jersey.
of 28 miles. The typical commuter train took 55 minutes from beginning to end, with another 15 minutes for the connecting ferryboat. From Demarest it was just 22 minutes to the Jersey City Terminal. How long is your commute today?
    — Submitted May 25, 2008, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia.

 
Categories. Notable Buildings
 
Demarest Railroad Station image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, May 1, 2008
4. Demarest Railroad Station
Today, the Railroad Station serves as the Demarest Senior Citizens Recreation Center.
Demarest Railroad Station image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, May 1, 2008
5. Demarest Railroad Station
This station was considered the "handsomest on the line" of New Jersey's Northern Railroad.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on May 1, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 3,089 times since then and 183 times this year. This page was the Marker of the Week June 1, 2008. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on May 1, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page.
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