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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Croom in Prince George's County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Enemy Bluff

Star-Spangled Banner Historic Trail

 
 
Enemy Bluff Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, July 13, 2014
1. Enemy Bluff Marker
Inscription. On August 22, 1814, American Brigadier General William Winder Spotted the enemy invasion force approaching this church, then called Page Chapel. The British marched west toward Bellefields, Woodyard, and Fort Washington, then doubled back before heading north to Upper Marlboro.

Uncertain of the enemy's intent, Winder held his troops overnight at Long Old Fields (now Forestville), two days later, the opposing armies battled at Bladensburg.

"I proceeded...to gain an observation of the enemy, and came with in view of the enemy's advance about two miles below the chapel."- American Brigadier General William H. Winder, September 26, 1814
 
Erected 2014 by National Park Service.
 
Location. 38° 44.91′ N, 76° 45.541′ W. Marker is in Croom, Maryland, in Prince George's County. Marker can be reached from Saint Thomas Church Road. Touch for map. Marker is in front of Saint Thomas Episcopal Church. Marker is at or near this postal address: 14300 Saint Thomas Church Rd, Upper Marlboro MD 20772, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. St. Thomas' Parish Church (within shouting distance of this marker); St. Simon's Episcopal Mission
Enemy Bluff Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, July 13, 2014
2. Enemy Bluff Marker
(about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); St. Simon's Mission, 1896 (about 700 feet away); Croom (approx. mile away); Bellefields (approx. one mile away); Shaded Reprieve (approx. 2 miles away); Columbia Air Center (approx. 2.7 miles away); Aviation History (approx. 2.9 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Croom.
 
Categories. Churches, Etc.War of 1812
 
Marching and Counter Marching image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, July 13, 2014
3. Marching and Counter Marching
British Soldiers marched past Page's Chapel, then made a feint to confuse the Americans.
Close-up of Gerry Embleton painting on marker
National Humiliation Day image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, July 13, 2014
4. National Humiliation Day
Page's Chapel was Episcopal Bishop Thomas John Claggett's home church. In 1812 President Madison declared the third Thursday in August a day of "fasting, prayer, and humiliation" for the declaration of war. Claggett ordered all churches in the Diocese of Maryland to comply.

Page's Chapel (1745) Architectural Rendering Firm of Milton L. Grigg, 1954.
Close-up of drawing on marker
Saint Thomas Episcopal Church image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, July 13, 2014
5. Saint Thomas Episcopal Church
The center part of this church was Page's Chapel.
Seven British Soldiers image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, July 13, 2014
6. Seven British Soldiers
Local legend tells that seven British soldiers who died of heatstroke on the march to Washington were buried in unmarked graves on the edge of the Berry family plot in St. Thomas Church Cemetery. These stones commemorate them.
Fielder Bowie (1792-1866) image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, July 13, 2014
7. Fielder Bowie (1792-1866)
Fielder Bowie II was a private in the 17th Maryland Militia during the War of 1812. Headstone in St.Thomas Church Cemetery
Eversfield Bowie (1773-1816) image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, July 13, 2014
8. Eversfield Bowie (1773-1816)
In Memory of Eversfield Bowie, Captain of Nottingham Cavalry Company, 7th Maryland Militia, War of 1812. Modern headstone in St.Thomas Church Cemetery
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on July 15, 2014, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page has been viewed 296 times since then and 26 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8. submitted on July 15, 2014, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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