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Ogdensburg in Saint Lawrence County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

How Ogdensburgh Captured Brockville

Ogdensburg Battlefield Trail

 
 
How Ogdensburgh Captured Brockville Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., July 4, 2014
1. How Ogdensburgh Captured Brockville Marker
Inscription.

On February 6, 1813, Captain Benjamin Forsyth learned from his spies and Canadian sympathizers that the British were holding a large number of Americans in the jail at Brockville. Repeated reports indicated that the Americans were being cruelly treated by their British captors. Forsyth also learned that some of those being held were being claimed by the British as deserters from the British army even though they had become citizens of the United States.

Spies informed Forsyth that the British intended to execute the "deserters" as an example to their own soldiers of what would happen if they fled the army to join the Yankees.

Forsyth and his officers agreed that they would launch a daring raid to rescue the prisoners. Forsyth's rifle regiment and John W. Lyttle's company of volunteers, numbering in total about 200, left at nine in the evening on foot and sleigh for the 12 mile hike to Morristown.

In Morristown, they convinced Arnold Smith, a tavern keeper, to act as their guide. Adjutant Daniel W. Church, a volunteer and veteran of many skirmishes on the ice with the British, suggested to Forsyth that the Americans march in two open columns across the river. At the shore, flank guards were sent to encircle the village, then known as Elizabethtown, now named Brockville.

The main body marched
How Ogdensburgh Captured Brockville Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., July 4, 2014
2. How Ogdensburgh Captured Brockville Marker
into the village, stationing themselves in the village square in front of the jail. One of the groups of soldiers, hearing the approach of a company of men, hailed them with the challenge, "Who comes there?"

He was answered by the reply, "not friends of King George."

Unfortunately, not hearing the the [sic] first word of the reply, he mistakenly assumed they were "Friends of King George." He fired, wounding one man.

The company turned out to be the left flank of the American force. Meanwhile, Captain Benjamin Forsyth, with a few men, entered the jail, and demanded the keys. They were surrendered without resistance. Every prisoner, with the exception of one prisoner being held for murder, was removed.

The freed prisoners, together with a group of prominent Brockville citizens who were taken as hostages, returned to Ogdensburgh with the daring raiders.

Forsyth's troops also seized 120 muskets, 20 rifles, two casks of ammunition, but no private property was either taken or destroyed. The prominent citizens were released after the force reached Ogdensburg.

The daring raid is described by modern historians as one of the most daring, though least known, raids of the entire War of 1812.

The raid angered the British, who feared Forsyth's daring and bravado. With his success, the British commanders were convinced that soon the American commander would set his sights on Prescott's Fort Wellington. If Forsyth could force the British from their fortifications in Prescott, the British knew, his cannon could control the river, cutting off the British supply lines to Upper Canada, starving the British troops in western Canada.

New York Governor Daniel Thompkins wrote to Brigadier General Jacob Brown to congratulate the "daring" and courageous Forsyth. Forsyth was promoted by his commanders to the rank of Lt. Colonel by brevet, his commission being dated Feb. 6 to commemorate the raid.
 
Erected by Standard Shade Roller and Downtown Battlefield Committee.
 
Location. 44° 41.969′ N, 75° 29.605′ W. Marker is in Ogdensburg, New York, in Saint Lawrence County. Touch for map. Monument is near the Civil War Soldiers' and Sailors' Memorial at Library Park. Marker is at or near this postal address: 312 Washington Street, Ogdensburg NY 13669, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Civil War Soldiers' and Sailors' Memorial (a few steps from this marker); Ogdensburg Public Library (within shouting distance of this marker); Ogdensburg And Forsyth: Friends Or Enemies (within shouting distance of this marker); 311 Washington Street (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Frederic Remington (1861 - 1909) (about 300 feet away); Remington Art Memorial (about 300 feet away); What Happened To The Patriots (about 500 feet away); Ogdensburgh And The War (about 500 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Ogdensburg.
 
Also see . . .
1. The War of 1812 in the North Country: 200 years later. (Submitted on July 28, 2014, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
2. Benjamin Forsyth Bio. (Submitted on July 28, 2014, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
3. Fire Along the Frontier: Raid on Brockville. (Submitted on July 28, 2014, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
 
Categories. Patriots & PatriotismWar of 1812
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on July 28, 2014, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 206 times since then and 29 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on July 28, 2014, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.
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