Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Fort Montgomery in Orange County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

North Redoubt

 
 
North Redoubt Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 23, 2008
1. North Redoubt Marker
Inscription. The term redoubt at Fort Montgomery means a strong point in the fortís walls. There were three redoubts at Fort Montgomery, including the North Redoubt, which you see here. Two of the redoubtís walls projected out from the fort so that enemies approaching the walls of the fort would be exposed to cannon and musket fire from the redoubt. About 15 feet outside the redoubt was a two-foot-deep ditch, which would have slowed an approaching enemy.

The lower portions of the redoubtís walls were formed of earth faced with stones. Assuming the redoubt was built like other sections of the fort, the upper part of the redoubtís walls were faced with bundles of saplings, called fascines. Around the inside of the redoubtís walls there was a banquette, or firing step, that soldiers could stand on to fire over the wall. The redoubt probably contained a few 6- or 12-pounder cannons. Archeologists found evidence of charred wood in the “point” of the redoubt, which was probably the remains of a cannon platform. The presence of pothooks, a fork, bottle glass, ceramics, teapots, and bone scraps suggest that soldiers gathered here to eat and socialize.
 
Erected by Fort Montgomery State Historic Site.
 
Location. 41° 19.55′ N, 73° 
Marker in Fort Montgomery State Historic Site image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 23, 2008
2. Marker in Fort Montgomery State Historic Site
The walking trail in Fort Montgomery State Historic Site passes the remains of earthworks and foundations of buildings from the original fort.
59.255′ W. Marker is in Fort Montgomery, New York, in Orange County. Marker can be reached from U.S. 9W, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is in Fort Montgomery State Historic Site on the walking trail, near Route 9W. Marker is in this post office area: Fort Montgomery NY 10922, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Battle Around the Redoubts (here, next to this marker); Barracks (within shouting distance of this marker); Fort Montgomery (within shouting distance of this marker); Enlisted Menís & Officersí Barracks (within shouting distance of this marker); Soldiersí Necessary (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Guard House (about 400 feet away); Powder Magazine (about 500 feet away); Welcome to Fort Montgomery (about 600 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Fort Montgomery.
 
More about this marker. The marker is dominated by a 2002 painting by Dahl Taylor of American troops in the redoubt. It has the caption ĎAccording to the testimony of Captain Rosicrans of the 5th New York Regiment, “the troops in Fort Montgomery were posted in three redoubts.” He went on to say that “the garrison at first gave the assailants a regular fire by platoons or divisions – but soon ran into a promiscuous fire as did the enemy.”
Marker at North Redoubt image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 23, 2008
3. Marker at North Redoubt
The remains of the North Redoubt can be seen in front of the marker.
This painting of the redoubt reflects Rosicransí account.í
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. This series of markers follow the walking tour of the Fort Montgomery Battlefield.
 
Also see . . .
1. The Battle of Fort's Montgomery and Clinton. The American Revolutionary War. (Submitted on May 4, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 

2. The Battle of Fort's Montgomery and Clinton. (Submitted on May 4, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.)
 
Categories. Forts, CastlesMilitaryNotable EventsNotable PlacesWar, US Revolutionary
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on May 4, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 1,079 times since then and 38 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on May 4, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page.
Paid Advertisement