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Concord in Merrimack County, New Hampshire — The American Northeast (New England)
 

Maj. Gen. John Stark

 
 
Maj. Gen. John Stark Marker image. Click for full size.
By Beverly Pfingsten, August 14, 2014
1. Maj. Gen. John Stark Marker
Inscription.
Born in Londonderry N.H.
Aug 28 1728
Died in Manchester N.H.
May 8 1822
Erected
by the State of
New Hampshire
A.D. 1890
Bennington
Bunker Hill

 
Location. 43° 12.412′ N, 71° 32.245′ W. Marker is in Concord, New Hampshire, in Merrimack County. Marker is at the intersection of North Main Street and Capitol Street, on the right when traveling south on North Main Street. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Concord NH 03301, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Dedicated to You, A Free Citizen in a Free Land (a few steps from this marker); Daniel Webster (within shouting distance of this marker); John P. Hale (within shouting distance of this marker); Franklin Pierce (within shouting distance of this marker); State Capitol (within shouting distance of this marker); In Grateful Tribute (within shouting distance of this marker); George Hamilton Perkins (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); New Hampshire's Presidential Primary (about 300 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Concord.
 
More about this marker. According to the Smithsonian National Art Inventories the work was commissioned in 1889, dedicated
Maj. Gen. John Stark Marker image. Click for full size.
By Beverly Pfingsten, August 14, 2014
2. Maj. Gen. John Stark Marker
on October 23, 1890, produced by sculptor Carl H. Conrads, 1839-1920; architect John A. Fox, the Ames Manufacturing Company, founder, with the New England Granite Works, fabricator. The monument features a full-length portrait of General John Stark seen in a Napoleonic stance; hat under his proper left arm, his proper right hand in his coat. He is dressed in military uniform, with sword at proper left side.

The idea for the statue originated with Prof. Taylor of Andover Theological Seminary in 1889. That year, the newly formed New Hampshire Society of the Sons of the Revolution asked for the memorial and by Aug. 14, 1889, the state legislature appropriated $12,000 for the statue. A committee selected an $8,000 proposal by New England Granite Works (Hartford, Connecticut); the model prepared by Carl Conrads, the company's sculptor. Conrads used a Trumbull portrait for Stark's face and modeled the body on John Francis Brines, a granite cutter and sculptor. The statue was cast by Ames Manufacturing Company and the pedestal designed by architect John A. Fox. The statue was completed by Oct. 1890 and dedicated Oct. 23, 1890.
 
Also see . . .  John Stark - Wikipedia. (Submitted on August 21, 2014, by Bill Pfingsten of Bel Air, Maryland.)
 
Categories. War, US Revolutionary
 
Maj. Gen. John Stark Marker image. Click for full size.
By Beverly Pfingsten, August 14, 2014
3. Maj. Gen. John Stark Marker
Gen. Stark Statue image. Click for full size.
By Beverly Pfingsten, August 14, 2014
4. Gen. Stark Statue
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on August 21, 2014, by Bill Pfingsten of Bel Air, Maryland. This page has been viewed 450 times since then and 36 times this year. Last updated on September 12, 2014, by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on August 21, 2014, by Bill Pfingsten of Bel Air, Maryland.
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