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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Fort Lee in Bergen County, New Jersey — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Soldier Hut

 
 
Soldier Hut Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 25, 2008
1. Soldier Hut Marker
Inscription. At Fort Lee, “hutting” – the building of permanent huts – was started at General Greene’s command to:

Fix proper places for barracks, none to be nearer the fort than 50 rods…build timber huts…boards are to be had only for the roof. The huts were to be 12 feet long by 9 feet wide, to have stone chimneys and to be ranged in proper streets.

The huts, each housing 8 men, had earth flooring with sod, mud and clay used to chink the log timbers. Stone, used for the fireplace and chimney, was cemented with clay or possibly lime mortar.

As late as 1900, just about 50 rods (825 feet) from the bastion site at the edge of Fort Lee Borough, stone heaps lined in regular rows could still be seen marking the location of some of those huts.
 
Erected by Fort Lee Historic Park.
 
Location. 40° 50.913′ N, 73° 57.821′ W. Marker is in Fort Lee, New Jersey, in Bergen County. Touch for map. Marker is in Fort Lee Historic Park on a walking trail to the south of the Visitor Center. Marker is in this post office area: Fort Lee NJ 07024, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Barbette Battery (a few steps from this marker); Musketry Breastwork
Marker at Fort Lee Historic Park image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 25, 2008
2. Marker at Fort Lee Historic Park
The soldier huts at Fort Lee Historic Park are recreations of ones that stood here during the Revolutionary War. Today they are used for interpretive purposes.
(within shouting distance of this marker); Abatis Construction at Fort Lee (within shouting distance of this marker); Historical Chronology 1776 (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Cannons (about 400 feet away); Military Magazine (about 500 feet away); Mortar Battery (about 600 feet away); The American Crisis (about 600 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Fort Lee.
 
More about this marker. The left of the marker contains an illustration of one of the soldier huts that used to stand on this site, and have been recreated here.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. This series of markers follows the walking tour of Fort Lee Historic Park.
 
Also see . . .  The Battle of Fort Washington. The American Revolution. (Submitted on May 16, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 
 
Categories. Forts, CastlesMilitaryNotable PlacesWar, US Revolutionary
 
Huts at Fort Lee image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 25, 2008
3. Huts at Fort Lee
Soldiers of the Continental Army stayed in huts like this until Fort Lee was abandoned in late 1776, after the fall of nearby Fort Washington.
Reenactors at the Soldier Hut Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, November 23, 2013
4. Reenactors at the Soldier Hut Marker
Soldier Hut image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 25, 2008
5. Soldier Hut
The Soldier Hut exhibit at Fort Lee Historic Park can be found along the walking path, south of the Visitor Center.
Soldier Hut in Fort Lee image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, November 23, 2013
6. Soldier Hut in Fort Lee
Inside the Soldier Hut image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, November 23, 2013
7. Inside the Soldier Hut
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on May 16, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 1,769 times since then and 59 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on May 16, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   4. submitted on November 23, 2013, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   5. submitted on May 16, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   6, 7. submitted on November 23, 2013, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page.
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