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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
St. John's in Division No. 1 (Avalon Peninsula), Newfoundland and Labrador — The Canadian Atlantic
 

Thompson Building

c 1847

 
 
Thompson Building Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, June 22, 2014
1. Thompson Building Marker
Inscription. Built after the 1846 fire, this structure housed a wide range of enterprises including Lash’s Bakery, the Railway Hotel, and McNamara and Thompson, both jewelers. Constructed with a timber frame, stone foundation and a brick exterior, it was among those downtown premises which survived the Great Fire of 1892.
 
Erected by Heritage Foundation of Newfoundland and Labrador.
 
Location. 47° 33.702′ N, 52° 42.597′ W. Marker is in St. John's, Newfoundland and Labrador, in Division No. 1 (Avalon Peninsula). Marker is on Water Street just from Beck's Cove, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 305 Water Street, St. John's, Newfoundland and Labrador A1C, Canada.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. O’Dwyer Block (a few steps from this marker); St. John’s Court House (approx. 0.3 kilometers away); (Royal Newfoundland Constabulary Monument) (approx. 0.3 kilometers away); St. John the Baptist Anglican Cathedral (approx. 0.4 kilometers away); William Carson (approx. 0.4 kilometers away); Masonic Temple (approx. half
Thompson Building Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, June 22, 2014
2. Thompson Building Marker
The marker is on the right end of the building.
a kilometer away); Former Bank of British North America (approx. half a kilometer away); Bank of British North America (approx. half a kilometer away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in St. John's.
 
Also see . . .  Thompson Building - Heritage Foundation of Newfoundland & Labrador. Rather than being made exclusively of wood, the builder, probably the merchant Richard O'Dwyer, opted for a brick exterior. This exterior helped save the building from serious damage decades later when the city's last Great Fire destroyed most of the city in 1892. (Submitted on November 22, 2014, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.) 
 
Categories. Industry & Commerce
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on November 22, 2014, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. This page has been viewed 231 times since then and 31 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on November 22, 2014, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
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