Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Fort Covington in Franklin County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Fort Covington

New York

 

1790

 
1790 Fort Covington New York Marker image. Click for full size.
By Anton Schwarzmueller, November 9, 2014
1. 1790 Fort Covington New York Marker
Inscription. First named French Mills in the 1790's by immigrant settlers who came from lower Canada to work in the Robertson and Buchanan Mills on the Salmon River. In 1817 it was renamed Fort Covington in honor of Brigadier General Leonard Covington, who died during the American - British War of 1812. General Covington was mortally wounded on November 11, 1813 at the battle of Chrysler's Farm in Williamsburg Ontario, Canada.
 
Location. 44° 59.304′ N, 74° 29.74′ W. Marker is in Fort Covington, New York, in Franklin County. Marker is on Chateaugay Street (New York State Route 37) 0.1 miles east of County Route 42, on the left when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is in a small public green space at the west end of the NY 37 bridge over the Salmon River. Marker is in this post office area: Fort Covington NY 12937, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 5 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. This Memorial is Dedicated by the Town of Ft. Covington (here, next to this marker); Fort Covington, New York (within shouting distance of this marker); On This Building Site was Headquarters of General Jacob Brown (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); War of 1812
1790 - Fort Covington - New York Marker image. Click for full size.
By Anton Schwarzmueller, November 9, 2014
2. 1790 - Fort Covington - New York Marker
The Salmon River is immediately behind the marker.
(about 500 feet away); On This Site was Built in 1812 a Blockhouse (about 700 feet away); a different marker also named War of 1812 (approx. 0.2 miles away); To The Memory of Westville Soldiers (approx. 4.3 miles away); In Honor of Those Who Served Our Country (approx. 4.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Fort Covington.
 
Regarding Fort Covington. Brigadier General Covington was evacuated after the Battle of Crysler's Farm to French Mills where he died on November 14, 1813. Brigadier General James Wilkinson named the blockhouse at French Mills "Fort Covington," which became the name for French Mills in 1817. The town is also named Fort Covington. Reference: Everest, Allan S.,"The War of 1812 in the Champlain Valley," Syracuse University Press, 1981.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. Leonard Covington birthplace and Battle of Crysler's Farm 1813 markers.
 
Also see . . .
1. Leonard Covington - Wikipedia. (Submitted on November 28, 2014, by Anton Schwarzmueller of Wilson, New York.)
2. Leonard Covington - Biographical Directory of the U.S. Congress
Westward image. Click for full size.
By Anton Schwarzmueller, November 9, 2014
3. Westward
County Road 42 in Background.
. (Submitted on November 28, 2014, by Anton Schwarzmueller of Wilson, New York.)
3. Battle of Crysler's Farm - Wikipedia. (Submitted on November 28, 2014, by Anton Schwarzmueller of Wilson, New York.)
 
Categories. Settlements & SettlersWar of 1812
 
Cover of Niles' Register, Volume V, September 4, 1813 - February 26, 1814 image. Click for full size.
By Ralph Eshelman
4. Cover of Niles' Register, Volume V, September 4, 1813 - February 26, 1814
Leonard Covington Portrait image. Click for full size.
By Ralph Eshelman, May 11, 2006
5. Leonard Covington Portrait
From Niles' Register, Volume V, September 4, 1813 - February 26, 1814.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on November 28, 2014, by Anton Schwarzmueller of Wilson, New York. This page has been viewed 256 times since then and 39 times this year. Last updated on December 4, 2014, by Anton Schwarzmueller of Wilson, New York. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on November 28, 2014, by Anton Schwarzmueller of Wilson, New York. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
Paid Advertisement