Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Fort Hancock in Hudspeth County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Camp Rice

Built in 1884-5

 
 
Camp Rice Marker image. Click for full size.
By William F Haenn, December 1, 2014
1. Camp Rice Marker
Inscription.
Department Commander
Brigadier General D.S. Stanley, U.S.A.
Planned by
Major J.G.C. Lee, Chief Quartermaster.
Post Commander
Captain T.A. Baldwin, 10th Cav’y.
Officer in charge of Construction
Lieut. E.B. Ives, 19th Inft’y.
Contractor
W.S. Pleasants.

 
Erected 1885 by U.S. Army.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Buffalo Soldiers, and the San Antonio-El Paso Road marker series.
 
Location. 31° 17.487′ N, 105° 51.472′ W. Marker is in Fort Hancock, Texas, in Hudspeth County. Marker is on State Highway 20 west of Knox Avenue (State Highway 148), on the left when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Fort Hancock TX 79839, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 1 other marker is within walking distance of this marker. Cpl. Benito Martinez (approx. 0.7 miles away).
 
Regarding Camp Rice. (Site of Fort Hancock) Fort Hancock began as a military establishment named Camp Rice in 1884, along the San Antonio-El Paso Military Road. Camp Rice took the place of Fort Quitman which was abandoned further south on the Rio Grande in 1877. The new post was established by troops of the 10th U.S. Cavalry
Camp Rice Marker site image. Click for full size.
By William F Haenn, December 1, 2014
2. Camp Rice Marker site
The site of Camp Rice/Fort Hancock is now a cotton field. The mountains in the distance are in Mexico.
the famed Buffalo Soldiers of the Indian Wars. Camp Rice did not grow after moving to this community, and rarely hosted more than sixty men. It was renamed Fort Hancock in 1886 after the death of General Winfield Scott Hancock, a hero of the battle of Gettysburg. The fort was damaged in a flood that year, but rebuilt. It was damaged again in a flood in 1894, then abandoned in 1895. Federal troops were sent to Fort Hancock in 1918 to contain Mexican "bandits and outlaws" operating along the border. It was suspected the bandits were being directed by German agents.
 
Categories. Forts, Castles
 
Bench made from the bricks of Fort Hancock image. Click for full size.
By William F Haenn, December 1, 2014
3. Bench made from the bricks of Fort Hancock
Brick bench from
old Ft. Hancock
1884-1895
Erected by
Hudspeth Valley Woman’s Club
1965
Brigadier General David S. Stanley image. Click for full size.
circa 1880s
4. Brigadier General David S. Stanley
Medal of Honor recipient and Commander of the Department of Texas at the time Camp Rice was built.
Theodore Anderson Baldwin image. Click for full size.
circa 1890s
5. Theodore Anderson Baldwin
Baldwin was the post commander at the time Camp Rice was built. He retired from the U.S. Army as a Brigadier General in 1903.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on December 4, 2014, by William F Haenn of Fort Clark (Brackettville), Texas. This page has been viewed 305 times since then and 83 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on December 4, 2014, by William F Haenn of Fort Clark (Brackettville), Texas. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
Paid Advertisement