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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Fort Washington in Prince George's County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Main Gateway

 
 
Main Gateway Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, March 1, 2008
1. Main Gateway Marker
Inscription. Two sets of gates protected the main entrance, or sally port. During the improvements made in the 1840s the drawbridge was added to make the approach to the gates more difficult.

The drawbridge, operated by a unique system of iron counterweights and chains, was designated to close rapidly in case of land attack.

(Sidebar): The entrance was also guarded by cannon. Thirteen guns, mounted on the parapet, covered the approaches to the gateway. To protect the area next to the wall and gateway, two casemates (gun rooms) were built into the wall flanking the bridge.
 
Location. 38° 42.7′ N, 77° 2.042′ W. Marker is near Fort Washington, Maryland, in Prince George's County. Marker can be reached from Fort Washington Road, on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. Located in Fort Washington Park, at the entrance to the fort. Marker is at or near this postal address: 13551 Fort Washington Road, Fort Washington MD 20744, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Northwest Demi-Bastion (a few steps from this marker); Caponiere (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Water Battery (about 400 feet away); Capital Guardian
Main Gateway Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, December 7, 2013
2. Main Gateway Marker
(about 400 feet away); a different marker also named Capital Guardian (about 400 feet away); a different marker also named Capital Guardian (about 400 feet away); a different marker also named The Water Battery (about 400 feet away); New Guns for an Old Fort (about 400 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Fort Washington.
 
More about this marker. The markers displays a line drawing of the drawbridge and gate workings. In the sidebar is an plan of the fort, indicating the location of the gateway and the guns covering the entrance.
 
Also see . . .  Fort Washington. National Park Service site. (Submitted on May 28, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. Forts, Castles
 
Drawbridge and Gateway to the Fort image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, March 1, 2008
3. Drawbridge and Gateway to the Fort
Sally Port image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, March 1, 2008
4. Sally Port
Drawbridge Mechanisms image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, March 1, 2008
5. Drawbridge Mechanisms
Casemate Covering the Drawbridge and Sally Port image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, March 1, 2008
6. Casemate Covering the Drawbridge and Sally Port
Drawbridge Mechanism image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, December 7, 2013
7. Drawbridge Mechanism
Close-up of diagram on marker
You are Here image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, December 7, 2013
8. You are Here
The entrance was also guarded by cannon. Thirteen guns, mounted on the parapet, covered the approaches to the gateway. To protect the area next to the wall and gateway, two casemates (gun rooms) were built into the wall flanking the bridge.
Close-up of map on marker
Main Gate Door image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, December 7, 2013
9. Main Gate Door
Roller for Drawbrige Chain image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, December 7, 2013
10. Roller for Drawbrige Chain
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on May 28, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 997 times since then and 23 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on May 28, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   2. submitted on November 30, 2014, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on May 28, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   7, 8, 9, 10. submitted on November 30, 2014, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.
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