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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Moran in Shackelford County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Moran

 
 
Moran Marker image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, December 29, 2014
1. Moran Marker
Inscription. Pioneers came to this area as early as the 1860s. During the Civil War (1861-65), they built the temporary fortress settlement of Mugginsville on Deep Creek. At one time, a branch of the Western Cattle Trail passed nearby. Population increased after the arrival of the Texas Central Railroad in 1881. The town of Moran was established by Swope Hull, who opened a grocery store at the rail crossing on Deep Creek in 1883. He was postmaster of the community’s first post office, called “Hulltown”, which opened August 29, 1883. Hull bought 160 acres between Post Oak and Deep Creeks and platted a townsite in March 1884. Most of the property was bought by I.B. (Bem) Scott, who sold his interests in 1890 to M.D. Bray (1845-1926), a prominent local merchant and landowner.
     The town’s name was changed in 1890 to “Hicks” and in 1892 to “Moran” for Texas Central Railroad president John J. Moran. By the 1890s, the community had a school and Baptist, Church of Christ, Cumberland Presbyterian, and Methodist congregations. A newspaper was begun in 1895 and bank in 1902. Incorporated in 1919, Moran was a shipping point for drilling supplies during the oil and gas boom of 1910-30. Today the area’s economy is based on farming, ranching, and oil and gas production.
 
Erected
Moran and Cottle No. 1 Markers image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, December 29, 2014
2. Moran and Cottle No. 1 Markers
Moran marker is on the left
1976 by Texas Historical Commission. (Marker Number 3468.)
 
Location. 32° 32.881′ N, 99° 9.827′ W. Marker is in Moran, Texas, in Shackelford County. Marker is on State Highway 6 south of Post Oak Avenue (Farm to Market Road 576), on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Moran TX 76464, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 15 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Cottle No. 1 (here, next to this marker); Granville E. Waters (approx. 1.4 miles away); Moran Cemetery (approx. 1.4 miles away); Ibex (approx. 9.5 miles away); Hittson Ranch Headquarters on Battle Creek (approx. 11.5 miles away); Burkett Pecan Tree (approx. 11.8 miles away); Military Telegraph Line (approx. 12.9 miles away); Shackelford County (approx. 14.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Moran.
 
Also see . . .
1. Moran, TX. From the Texas State Historical Association’s “Handbook of Texas Online”. (Submitted on January 3, 2015.) 

2. Moran, "The Town of Three Names". From the Shackelford County TXGenWeb website. (Submitted on January 3, 2015.) 

3. Western Trail. From the Texas State Historical Association’s “Handbook of Texas Online”. (Submitted on January 3, 2015.) 
 
Categories. Railroads & StreetcarsSettlements & Settlers
 
Western Cattle Trail Marker image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, December 29, 2014
3. Western Cattle Trail Marker
Located near the Moran marker, this cement post marks the route of the Western Cattle Trail
View to North Towards Intersection of State Highway 6 and Farm to Market Road 576 image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, December 29, 2014
4. View to North Towards Intersection of State Highway 6 and Farm to Market Road 576
View to East Across State Highway 6 image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, December 29, 2014
5. View to East Across State Highway 6
View to South Along State Highway 6 image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, December 29, 2014
6. View to South Along State Highway 6
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on January 3, 2015, by Duane Hall of Abilene, Texas. This page has been viewed 242 times since then and 40 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on January 3, 2015, by Duane Hall of Abilene, Texas.
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