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Cameron in Coconino County, Arizona — The American Mountains (Southwest)
 

Cameron

Originally Tanner's Crossing

 
 
Cameron Marker image. Click for full size.
By Wyndfire, October 25, 2009
1. Cameron Marker
Inscription. Named for one of Arizona's first U.S. Senators. A pioneer in development of trails and copper mines in Grand Canyon. Near here was the site of Tanner's Crossing of the Little Colorado River on the Mormon Trail from Utah via Lee Ferry to settlements in Arizona and New Mexico.
 
Erected 1960 by Arizona Development Board/Arizona Highway Department.
 
Location. 35° 52.578′ N, 111° 24.721′ W. Marker is in Cameron, Arizona, in Coconino County. Marker can be reached from U.S. 89, on the left when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is located near the Cameron Trading Post, to the north end of the parking lot. One marker is on a stone on the ground. One marker is affixed to the top of the bridge. Marker is in this post office area: Cameron AZ 86020, United States of America.
 
Regarding Cameron. Information from The Rough Guide to the Grand Canyon By Greg Ward, Rough Guides

The Mormon Trail originally crossed the Little Colorado River at a rocky ford six miles upstream. That became known as Tannerís Crossing, in honor of Seth Tanner, a Mormon prospector from Tuba City who built a house nearby in the 1870ís. He later expanded his operations into the Grand Canyon area, where he also gave his name to
Cameron Bridge and Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, May 17, 2016
2. Cameron Bridge and Marker
the Tanner Trail.
The danger from quicksand and flooding at Tannerís Crossing led to the construction of the first suspension bridge across the gorge in 1911, Cameron – named for another legendary canyon prospector, Ralph Cameron – developed on the south side of the span. That one-lane bridge is still there, but now it only carries an oil pipeline, having been superseded by a broader modern highway bridge.

The Cameron Trading Post, clustered beside the two bridges, remains what it started out as in 1916 – a trading center for the Navajo Nation. Residents still stock up on supplies, catch up with friends, fill up their gas tanks, and pick up their mail, and much of the trading postís business is still conducted by barter.
 
Categories. Notable PlacesSettlements & Settlers
 
Cameron Suspension Bridge image. Click for full size.
By Wyndfire, October 25, 2009
3. Cameron Suspension Bridge
Suspension Bridge image. Click for full size.
By Wyndfire, October 25, 2009
4. Suspension Bridge
Sign on Suspension Bridge image. Click for full size.
By Wyndfire, October 25, 2009
5. Sign on Suspension Bridge
Built 1911 by
The Midland Bridge Co.
Freygang and Tro Con Prop 8.
Kansas City, Mo.
For Office of Indian Affairs
Robt. G. Valentine, Commissioner
F. H. Abbott, 1st Asst
C. F. Hauke, 2nd Asst
W. H. Gode, Chief Engineer
John Charles, Supervisor
John J. Granville Construction
H. F. Robinson, Resident
Gen. W. A. Marshall, Consulting
Arizona Constructs the Third Bridge at this Point on the Little Colorado image. Click for full size.
By Chris English, October 2, 2015
6. Arizona Constructs the Third Bridge at this Point on the Little Colorado
As Cameron become more sophisticated and traffic on US 89 explodes, 104 years after the Bureau of Indian Affairs bridge, and 52 years after the US 89 span, the Arizona Department of Transportation is completing a major overhaul of the local transportation system. A third bridge over the Little Colorado River is a major component of this project.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on November 28, 2010, by Wyndfire of Phoenix, Arizona. This page has been viewed 938 times since then and 31 times this year. Last updated on February 10, 2015, by Chris English of Phoenix, Arizona. Photos:   1. submitted on November 28, 2010, by Wyndfire of Phoenix, Arizona.   2. submitted on May 24, 2016, by Bill Kirchner of Tucson, Arizona.   3, 4, 5. submitted on December 1, 2010, by Wyndfire of Phoenix, Arizona.   6. submitted on February 10, 2015, by Chris English of Phoenix, Arizona. • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page.
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