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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
St. Leonard in Calvert County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Sukeek’s Cabin: A Proud Tradition Lives On

 
 
Sukeek’s Cabin: A Proud Tradition Lives On Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, February 10, 2015
1. Sukeek’s Cabin: A Proud Tradition Lives On Marker
Inscription. JPPM archaeologists had long known that a stone house foundation, overgrown with weeds, sat in the woods in front of you. But who had lived there was a mystery. Then in 1996, two former local residents---Daniel and Minnie Octavia Gross Brown---were interviewed by JPPM staff. Daniel described walking through the woods in the 1940s going from the St. Leonard Creek house of Minnie Octavia’s mother to his job at the Patterson Farm (now JPPM). Along the way he passed the ruined cabin of his wife’s great-great grandmother, a formerly enslaved woman named Sukeek. Armed with this vital piece of family tradition, archaeologists began to study the site in detail. Oral history, like that provided by the Browns, and their relatives, can reveal valuable information that is not available from any other source.

(Inscription under the photos in the upper left)
Daniel Brown; Minnie Octavia Gross Brown.

(Inscription under the image in the center)
Daniel Brown passed by Sukeek’s Cabin as he walked from his mother-in-law’s house to work at the Patterson farm.

(Inscription under the image in the upper center)
1850 slave census, showing enslaved people held by George Patterson, owner of the JPPM property at that time. The typed names are speculations by JPPM staff. Slaves were not named in this census. According to family tradition,

Close up of the may on the Sukeek’s Cabin: A Proud Tradition Lives On Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, February 10, 2015
2. Close up of the may on the Sukeek’s Cabin: A Proud Tradition Lives On Marker
The path leading from here to Sukeek’s Cabin is moderately steep.
Sukeek had a daughter named Sobeck or Rebecca, and a granddaughter named Jane Dawkins Johnson.

Jane reportedly died of a broken heart she was told, in error, that her son had been killed while serving in Europe during World War I.

Knowing this, JPPM staff looked for death certificates from that time, and soon found Jane’s. On it, he mother was listed as Becky Coats—giving us Sobeck’s full identity, and confirming the accuracy of the family stories.

(Inscription under the photo in the far upper right)
Eliza Gross and her daughter Evelyn and Bessie. Eliza was Jane Johnson’s daughter, great-great-granddaughter of Sukeek, and the mother of Minnie Octavia Gross Brown.

(Inscription under the photo in the lower right)
Jane Johnson’s death certificate.
 
Erected by Maryland Historical Trust.
 
Location. 38° 23.673′ N, 76° 30.368′ W. Marker is in St. Leonard, Maryland, in Calvert County. Marker is on Jefferson Patterson Park Road. Touch for map. The marker is on the grounds of the Jefferson Patterson Park and Museum. Marker is in this post office area: Saint Leonard MD 20685, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Land Battle Evidence (within shouting distance of this marker); “The Commodore Can Beat Any…Barges…Sent Against Him”

Sukeek’s Cabin: A Proud Tradition Lives On Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, February 10, 2015
3. Sukeek’s Cabin: A Proud Tradition Lives On Marker
(within shouting distance of this marker); Valor at St. Leonard Creek (within shouting distance of this marker); John Stuart Skinner (within shouting distance of this marker); “We Must Have Done Them Considerable Damage” (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Search for the Chesapeake Flotilla (about 400 feet away); Attention to Detail-Gertrude Sawyer, Architect (about 400 feet away); The Government at St. Leonard’s (about 400 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in St. Leonard.
 
Categories. African AmericansSettlements & Settlers
 
Sign at the entrance to Jefferson Patterson Park and Museum image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, February 10, 2015
4. Sign at the entrance to Jefferson Patterson Park and Museum
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on February 26, 2015, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. This page has been viewed 213 times since then and 33 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on February 26, 2015, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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