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Tucson in Pima County, Arizona — The American Mountains (Southwest)
 

Presidio San Agustín del Tucson

 
 
Presidio San Agustín del Tucson Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, January 8, 2012
1. Presidio San Agustín del Tucson Marker
Inscription. For about 80 years, the adobe walls of the Tucson Presidio protected the residents of the area from attacks by Apache groups, who opposed Spanish and Mexican peoples and their native allies beginning in the 1600s. The Spanish military designated the site in 1775 on the location of a prehistoric native village site. The fort housed 100 soldiers at its height, and 300 civilians lived in the area, with several hundred O'odham and Aravaipa Apache allies in the vicinity. The main gate for the fort was located south of here at Alameda Street. The interior walls were lined with residences, stables, a blacksmith shop, and warehouses. The walls of the fort were dismantled after abandonment by Mexican forces in 1856 and were mostly gone by 1862. The last visible wall segment was photographed in 1915, and taken down soon after that. Remnants of the wall foundations are still preserved beneath the lawns, streets, and buildings of downtown Tucson. The reconstructed northeast corner of the Presidio is on the southwest corner of Washington Street and Church Avenue.
 
Erected 2011 by the Tucson Presidio Trust and Pima County Supervisor Richard Elias.
 
Location. 32° 13.446′ N, 110° 58.552′ W. Marker is in Tucson, Arizona, in Pima
Presidio San Agustín del Tucson Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, January 6, 2012
2. Presidio San Agustín del Tucson Marker
County. Marker is at the intersection of North Main Avenue and West Paseo Redondo, on the right when traveling south on North Main Avenue. Touch for map. Marker is on the northwest corner. Marker is in this post office area: Tucson AZ 85701, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Mansions of Main Avenue (a few steps from this marker); N. W. Corner Adobe Wall of Spanish Presidio of Tucson (a few steps from this marker); Presidio Wall (a few steps from this marker); Hiram S. Stevens House (within shouting distance of this marker); Leonardo Romero House (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Meyer Street (about 400 feet away); Main Gate (about 400 feet away); Edward Nye Fish House (about 400 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Tucson.
 
Regarding Presidio San Agustín del Tucson. Regarding Presidio San Agustin del Tucson.
Presidio San Agustin del Tucson is #1 on the Presidio Trail Walking Tour.
The description reads:
“On August 20th, 1775, Lt. Col. Hugo O’Conor, an Irishman serving in the Spanish Army, founded a fort in what is now downtown Tucson. With the exception of a small Spanish chapel across the Santa Cruz River at the foot of “A” Mountain, this was the first European structure in Tucson. By the 1780s, when the 11-acre fort
Presidio San Agustin del Tucson Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, January 8, 2012
3. Presidio San Agustin del Tucson Marker
Marker is in center of photo.
was completed, it consisted of 10-foot-high adobe walls and two corner towers, each 20 feet high. The fort marked the northwestern edge of the Spanish frontier in Arizona. The northeast corner of the presidio has been reconstructed on its original site at Church and Washington and is open to the public.”
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker.
 
Categories. Forts, CastlesSettlements & Settlers
 
Reconstructed corner of Presidio image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, January 8, 2012
4. Reconstructed corner of Presidio
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on January 9, 2012, by Bill Kirchner of Tucson, Arizona. This page has been viewed 643 times since then and 51 times this year. Last updated on May 13, 2015, by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on January 9, 2012, by Bill Kirchner of Tucson, Arizona. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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