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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Tucson in Pima County, Arizona — The American Mountains (Southwest)
 

The First Presbyterian Church in Tucson

 
 
The First Presbyterian Church in Tucson Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, January 10, 2010
1. The First Presbyterian Church in Tucson Marker
Inscription. On this site stood the first Presbyterian Church, and the second Protestant Church in Arizona. It was organized in 1874 for Presbyterian Missions in the Territories by the Reverend Sheldon Jackson and constructed by the Reverend J. A. Anderson, with financial support from the citizens of Tucson. The cornerstone of the Gothic style, adobe church was laid June 13, 1878 on land purchased from the City of Tucson within Courthouse Plaza. The building was sold to the Congregational Church in 1881. Construction of a new city hall in 1917 caused the church to be demolished. A new Presbyterian congregation, organized in 1902, erected the Trinity Presbyterian Church at Fourth Avenue and University Boulevard.

Spanish translation:
La Primera Iglesia Presbiterial de Tucsón
En este sitio fue colocado la primera Iglesia Presbiterial y la segundo Iglesia Protestante en Arizona. Fue organizada en 1874 por Las Misiones Presbiteriales en los Territorios por el Rdo. Sheldon Jackson y construida por el Rdo. J.A. Anderson, con el apoyo de financia de los ciudadanos de Tucson. Se fijó la piedra angular de la iglesia estilo Gótico hecha de adobe el 13 de junio de 1878 dentro de la Plaza del Palacio de Justicia en terreno que fue comprado de la Ciudad de Túcson . El edificio se vendio a la Iglesia Congregacionalista
The First Presbyterian Church in Tucson Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, January 10, 2010
2. The First Presbyterian Church in Tucson Marker
Spanish translation of marker text.
en 1881. La construcción de un nueva ayuntamiento en 1917 causó la derribarción de la iglesia. En 1902 se organizó una congregación nueva de Presbiterales y fabricaron la Iglesia Presbiterial de la Trinidad en la Avenida Cuarta y Bulevar Universidad.
 
Erected by Tucson – Pima County Historical Commission.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Arizona, The Presidio Trail marker series.
 
Location. 32° 13.382′ N, 110° 58.465′ W. Marker is in Tucson, Arizona, in Pima County. Marker can be reached from W. Alameda St.. Touch for map. Marker can be reached from West Alameda Street. Marker is in El Presidio Park, between West Alameda Street and West Pennington Street. Marker is in this post office area: Tucson AZ 85701, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Exchange at the Presidio (within shouting distance of this marker); Commemorating the Raising of the First American Flag within the Walled City of Tucson (within shouting distance of this marker); Plaza Militar (within shouting distance of this marker); Tucson Old Walled City (within shouting distance of this marker); Padre-Eusebio-Francisco-Kino, S.J.
The First Presbyterian Church in Tucson Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, January 10, 2010
3. The First Presbyterian Church in Tucson Marker
View is southwest showing marker and Tucson City Hall in background.
(within shouting distance of this marker); Plaza de las Armas (within shouting distance of this marker); Veterans of the Battle of the Bulge (within shouting distance of this marker); Vietnam War Memorial (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Tucson.
 
Categories. Churches & Religion
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on January 13, 2010, by Bill Kirchner of Tucson, Arizona. This page has been viewed 1,077 times since then and 58 times this year. Last updated on May 13, 2015, by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on January 13, 2010, by Bill Kirchner of Tucson, Arizona. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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