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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Port Bolivar in Galveston County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Jane Herbert Wilkinson Long

(July 23, 1798 – December 30, 1880)

 
 
Jane Herbert Wilkinson Long Marker image. Click for full size.
By Jim Evans, May 15, 2015
1. Jane Herbert Wilkinson Long Marker
Inscription. Born in Charles County, Maryland, Jane Herbert Wilkinson Long was a Texas pioneer. She married James Long in 1815, and joined him in Texas during his military invasion of the then-Spanish colony, settling in Nacogdoches. The occupation was unsuccessful, but the Longs returned with supporters in 1820, building a fort on the Bolivar peninsula at the eastern entrance to Galveston Bay. James Long left for La Bahia to gain support, but was captured and imprisoned in Monterrey. Meanwhile, Jane, along with her daughter Ann and slave Kian, remained at the fort, facing frigid winter temperatures, lack of food and supplies, and danger from the native Karankawas. In the midst of these difficulties, Jane Long gave birth to a child, leading to her honorary designation as “mother of Texas.”

After hearing of her husband’s death, Long led her family to settle at various places along the San Jacinto river and in San Antonio. The family moved to be with kin in Louisiana and Mississippi in 1823, but returned in 1825 as part of Stephen F. Austin’s first colony, receiving her own headright of land, usually accorded only to a male head of household. She settled in San Felipe de Austin.

During the Texas war for independence, Long opened her boarding house for rallies and meetings, while also gathering information from Mexican
Bolivar Point & Jane Herbert Wilkinson Long Markers image. Click for full size.
By Jim Evans
2. Bolivar Point & Jane Herbert Wilkinson Long Markers
officers and storing arms and munitions. She fled with others during the Runaway Scrape. After the war, in her remaining years, Long operated a boarding house and plantation in Fort Bend County. Today, Jane Herbert Wilkinson Long continues to be remembered as a Texas patriot and a pioneer of the Texas frontier.
 
Erected 2010 by Texas Historical Commission. (Marker Number 16374.)
 
Location. 29° 22.079′ N, 94° 45.502′ W. Marker is near Port Bolivar, Texas, in Galveston County. Marker is at the intersection of State Highway 87 and Anderson Avenue, on the right when traveling east on State Highway 87. Touch for map. Marker is located at the entrance to Fort Travis Seashore Park. Marker is in this post office area: Port Bolivar TX 77650, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 5 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Bolivar Point (a few steps from this marker); Fort Travis (approx. 0.4 miles away); Point Bolivar (was approx. 0.9 miles away but has been reported missing. ); Fort San Jacinto (approx. 2.3 miles away); Galveston Island (approx. 2.9 miles away); Galveston, C. S. A. (approx. 3.6 miles away); Galveston Medical College (approx. 4.1 miles away); "Old Red" (approx. 4.1 miles away).
 
Also see . . .
Lighthouse Across the Highway From Markers image. Click for full size.
By Jim Evans
3. Lighthouse Across the Highway From Markers
Point Bolivar Light is a historic lighthouse in Port Bolivar, Texas, that was built in 1872. It served for 61 years before being retired in 1933. The current lighthouse is at least the second structure at the site. The first lighthouse was built in the mid-1850s and was taken down during the Civil War so that Union warships could not use it as a navigational aid. After withstanding over 150 years of erosion, the lighthouse is now entirely black. This has caused some to call it "The Haunted Lighthouse" of Bolivar.

1. Jane Long in the Handbook of Texas. (Submitted on May 18, 2015, by Jim Evans of Houston, Texas.)
2. Jane Long in Wikipedia. (Submitted on May 18, 2015, by Jim Evans of Houston, Texas.)
3. Jane Long in History's Women. (Submitted on May 18, 2015, by Jim Evans of Houston, Texas.)
4. Jane Long at Texana Living History Association. (Submitted on May 18, 2015, by Jim Evans of Houston, Texas.)
5. Jane Long in Lone Star Junction. (Submitted on May 18, 2015, by Jim Evans of Houston, Texas.)
6. Jane Long in Houston TeacherTech at Rice Univiersity. (Submitted on May 18, 2015, by Jim Evans of Houston, Texas.)
7. Article on Jane Long in the Houston Chronicle's "Tolday in Texas History". (Submitted on May 18, 2015, by Jim Evans of Houston, Texas.)
8. Jane Long in Celebrating Texas (pdf file). (Submitted on May 18, 2015, by Jim Evans of Houston, Texas.)
9. Jane Long in Find a Grave. (Submitted on May 18, 2015, by Jim Evans of Houston, Texas.)
 
Categories. Patriots & PatriotismSettlements & SettlersWar, Texas Independence
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on May 17, 2015, by Jim Evans of Houston, Texas. This page has been viewed 377 times since then and 100 times this year. Last updated on May 19, 2015, by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on May 17, 2015, by Jim Evans of Houston, Texas.   3. submitted on May 16, 2015, by Jim Evans of Houston, Texas. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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