Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Gordonsburg in Lewis County, Tennessee — The American South (East South Central)
 

Phosphate Mine

 
 
Phosphate Mine Marker image. Click for full size.
By Sandra Hughes, March 13, 2012
1. Phosphate Mine Marker
Inscription. From here north for approximately 40 miles the parkway passes through or near a geologic region of limestone rich in phosphate deposits.

Abandoned mine shafts in limestone ledges on both sides of the parkway in this immediate area are silent reminders of past mining activity.

A 5-minute walk to your right leads to an abandoned railroad bed and a collapsed mineshaft in a limestone outcrop.
 
Erected by United States Department of the Interior National Park Service.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Natchez Trace marker series.
 
Location. 35° 34.119′ N, 87° 25.863′ W. Marker is in Gordonsburg, Tennessee, in Lewis County. Marker is on Natchez Trace Parkway 0.6 miles south of Columbia Highway (U.S. 412). Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Hohenwald TN 38462, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 7 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Meriwether Lewis (approx. 4.3 miles away); Natchez Trace (approx. 4.4 miles away); Grinder House (approx. 4.4 miles away); The Natchez Trace – Early American Trail (approx. 4½ miles
View to North Along Natchez Trace Parkway image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, June 4, 2015
2. View to North Along Natchez Trace Parkway
away); Meriwether Lewis: Life Compass (approx. 4½ miles away); Lands of the Chickasaw (approx. 6 miles away); Civil War in Lewis County (approx. 7 miles away); Lewis County War Memorial (approx. 7 miles away).
 
Also see . . .
1. Natchez Trace. Official National Park Service website. (Submitted on June 22, 2015, by Duane Hall of Abilene, Texas.) 

2. Phosphate Mining and Industry. From The Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture website. (Submitted on June 22, 2015, by Duane Hall of Abilene, Texas.) 
 
Categories. Industry & Commerce
 
Trail Head to Phosphate Mine image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, June 4, 2015
3. Trail Head to Phosphate Mine
Trail near Dinkey Line Sign image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, June 4, 2015
4. Trail near Dinkey Line Sign
Dinkey Line Sign on Trail image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, June 4, 2015
5. Dinkey Line Sign on Trail
You are now walking on an abandoned railroad bed where “DINKEY” engines on miniature tracks hauled small pushcarts of blue phosphate ore to a washer near Gordonsburg.
Over 1,000 miles of track have been abandoned in Tennessee because the resources have been exhausted.
Phosphate Mine Shaft image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, June 4, 2015
6. Phosphate Mine Shaft
Phosphate Mine Sign on Trail image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, June 4, 2015
7. Phosphate Mine Sign on Trail
   Phosphate in these limestone layers came from shellfish deposited here some 400 million years ago. Recently, geologically speaking, these limestone ledges became exposed.
   Through the years, unknown and uncounted men have passed this ledge, ignorant of the wealth it held. Certainly, some of them needed the phosphate to revitalize their worn-out farms.
   About 1880, man learned the importance of phosphate as a fertilizer, discovered it here, and began to mine it.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on March 16, 2012, by Sandra Hughes of Killen, Usa. This page has been viewed 613 times since then and 54 times this year. Last updated on June 23, 2015, by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico. Photos:   1. submitted on March 16, 2012, by Sandra Hughes of Killen, Usa.   2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on June 22, 2015, by Duane Hall of Abilene, Texas. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
Paid Advertisement