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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Krinides in Kavala Regional Unit, Eastern Macedonia and Thrace Region, Greece
 

Christian Philippi

 
 
Christian Philippi Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, June 16, 2015
1. Christian Philippi Marker
Inscription. English Text:

Philippi was a flourishing city in eastern Macedonia during the Hellenistic, Roman, and Early Christian periods, with continuous habitation from the mid-4th century BC to the 14th century AD. The city's 3500-meter long fortification wall was repaired and supplemented during the Roman and Byzantine periods.

The start of the Christian period at Philippi was marked by the arrival of the Apostle Paul in 49-50 AD and the founding of the first Christian community on European soil. The activities of Paul and his companions, Silas, Timotheus (Timothy), and probably Loukas (Luke), their imprisonment and their miraculous liberation are described in the Acts of the Apostles. Tradition holds that the first Christian convert, the dealer in purple Lydia, was baptized in the waters of the Gangitis, outside the modern village named in her honor. As may also be seen in his letter to the Philippians, the Apostle Paul developed special bonds with the city, which he visited on two further occasions, in 56 and 57 AD. However, there are no building remains of the 1st century AD at the archaeological site of Philippi. As time passed, the new religion displaced Roman syncretism, and the Greek language, which was used in preaching Christianity until the 3rd century AD, prevailed over Latin.

With the recognition
Christian Philippi Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, June 16, 2015
2. Christian Philippi Marker
Close-up view, that is displayed on the marker, of a 1847 illustration, showing how the ruins of the basilica at Philippi appeared.
of Christianity as the official religion of the empire (313 AD), Philippi became a metropolitan see (bishopric). During the following centuries, the city was adorned with monumental Christian churches (the Octagon, Basilicas A, B, and I, cemetery basilicas outside the walls) and transformed into a center of Christian worship.

However, from the 4th century AD, when there were successive invasions of the territories of the Byzantine Empire, such raids put a strain on the flourishing city. In 473, by virtue of a raid by the Goths, its suburbs were devastated. In the late 6th and early 7th centuries, earthquakes caused extensive damage to public and private buildings; some of these were repaired, while others were abandoned. At the same time, Arab-Slav raids influenced the urban character of the city and brought about the contraction, though not complete disappearance of social and economic life. Building remains that demonstrate the continuation of life at Philippi during the Middle Byzantine Period are found in Basilica I, in the Octagon, and in building blocks east of the Octagon.
 
Location. 41° 0.739′ N, 24° 17.071′ E. Marker is near Krinides, Eastern Macedonia and Thrace Region, in Kavala Regional Unit. Marker can be reached from Agiou Christoforou just west of Filippou, on the right
Christian Philippi Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, June 16, 2015
3. Christian Philippi Marker
Close-up view, that is displayed on the marker, of a photograph, showing the restoration of Basilica A.
when traveling west. Touch for map. This marker is located in the archaeological park, on the other side of the modern day roadway that cuts through the park, in the area of the park south of where the Roman forum is located. Marker is in this post office area: Krinides, Eastern Macedonia and Thrace Region 640 03, Greece.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 14 kilometers of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Basilica (within shouting distance of this marker); The Octagon at Philippi (within shouting distance of this marker); Annexes to Octagon at Philippi (about 90 meters away, measured in a direct line); Ancient Theater (about 240 meters away); Philippi (approx. 0.3 kilometers away); Archeological Area Filippi (approx. 0.4 kilometers away); Black Sea - Silk Road (approx. 11.5 kilometers away); Neapolis-Christoupolis-Kavala (7th C.BC. - 20th C.AD.) (approx. 13.8 kilometers away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Krinides.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. To better understand the relationship, study each marker in the order shown.
 
Categories. Notable Places
 
Christian Philippi Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, June 16, 2015
4. Christian Philippi Marker
Close-up view, that is displayed on the marker, of a photograph, showing the restoration of Basilica B.
Christian Philippi, Basilica B image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, June 16, 2015
5. Christian Philippi, Basilica B
A present day view, of Basilica B (to compare to photo #4 that shows the same structure from an earlier time).
Christian Philippi Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, June 16, 2015
6. Christian Philippi Marker
Close-up view, that is displayed on the marker, of a photograph, showing the founder's inscription from the renovation of the "fortress" of Philippi, 10th century AD.
Christian Philippi Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, June 16, 2015
7. Christian Philippi Marker
Close-up view, that is displayed on the marker, of a photograph, showing the pavement of the Via Egnatia inside the city.
Christian Philippi Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, June 16, 2015
8. Christian Philippi Marker
View of the marker, shown along the park's walking tour pathway, which in this picture is also along the pavement stones of the Via Egnatia.
Christian Philippi Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, June 16, 2015
9. Christian Philippi Marker
A more distant view of the marker, shown along the park's walking tour pathway, which in this picture is also along the pavement stones of the Via Egnatia.
Christian Philippi Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, June 16, 2015
10. Christian Philippi Marker
A distant view of the marker (left side of the picture), along with the ruins of Philippi.
Christian Philippi Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, June 16, 2015
11. Christian Philippi Marker
A much more distant view of the marker (left side of the picture), along with the ruins of Philippi.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on June 28, 2015, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio. This page has been viewed 385 times since then and 89 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11. submitted on June 28, 2015, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.
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