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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Archea Korinthos (Old Corinth) in Corinthia Regional Unit, Peloponnese Region, Greece
 

Lechaion Road

 
 
Lechaion Road Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, June 22, 2015
1. Lechaion Road Marker
Inscription. English Text:

Propylaie on the Lechaion Road
The Propylaia, the main entrance to the Forum, consisted of three archways; one main and two smaller ones. At the time of Pausanias the gilded bronze chariots of Helios and Phaethon stood on this imposing building. The Propylaia dates from the 1st century A.D.

The Lechaion Road
The main north-south artery (cardo maximus) of the Roman city, ultimately linked the Agora of Corinth with the harbour of Lechaion on the Corinthian gulf 3 kilometers to the north. In the time of Augustus, it was unpaved and was open to wheeled traffic. The road was paved with limestone slabs under Vespasian, when traffic was confined to pedestrians. At this period there were narrow pavements either side of the road with gutters to carry away rainwater. A row of shops was created on the east and west sides of the road, and colonnades and bases for dedications were set between the shops and the pavements. The road began to lose its importance from the 10th century A.D. onwards and was finally abandoned after the earthquake of 1858.

Monuments to the West of the Lechaion Road
Today a row of sixteen small shops can clearly be made out the west side of the road. To the west of these shops, the most important
Lechaion Road Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, June 22, 2015
2. Lechaion Road Marker
Close-up view, that is displayed on the marker, of an illustration, showing the Roman period, reconstruction of the captives' Facade and the Propylaia on the Lechaion Road. Note, the view is as if one was standing on the "Bema" looking northwest across the Roman Forum, with the structure called the Propylaia being the gateway between the Roman Forum and the Lechaion Road.
building was the large Roman basilica (1st-2nd century A.D.), which was probably caused used as a courthouse. Its facade, facing the main area of the Forum, was adorned with colossal figures of Phrygian Phrygian prisoners-of-war (late 2nd - early 3rd century A.D.) To the north of the basilica the remains of a commercial market are preserved. Later this was replaced by a new semicircular market with an Ionic colonnade.

Monuments to the East of the Lechaion Road
To the east of the Lechaion Road, north of the Peirene Fountain, are preserved the foundations of Temple A (Classical period), which was converted in a second building phase into a heroon (Hellenistic period). To the east of this structure lies the so-called Periboios of Apollo (1st century A.D.). This was an open courtyard surrounded by a marble Ionic colonnade, which was used as a commercial market. At the north-east end of the street are preserved the ruins of a large bathhouse dating from the 2nd century A.D. This bath has been identified as the Baths of the Spartan Eurycles seen by the travel-writer Pausanias.
 
Erected by LZ Ephoreia of Prehistoric & Classical Antiquities.
 
Location. 37° 54.337′ N, 22° 52.817′ E. Marker is in Archea Korinthos (Old Corinth), Peloponnese
Lechaion Road Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, June 22, 2015
3. Lechaion Road Marker
View of the marker in the foreground with the ruins of the Lechaion Road seen in the background (I believe that the marker is situated where the Propylaia would have been).
Region, in Corinthia Regional Unit. Marker can be reached from Enotiki Archeas Korinthou north of EO Korinthou Argous (Local Route 7), on the left when traveling north. Touch for map. This marker is located in the Archaeological Park of Ancient Corinth, and is situated near the northern edge of the Roman Agora, directly between the ruins of the Roman Agora (to the south) and the ruins of Lechaion Road (to the north). Marker is in this post office area: Archea Korinthos (Old Corinth), Peloponnese Region 200 07, Greece.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Peirene Fountain (within shouting distance of this marker); The Heroon at the Crossroads: an early sanctuary of Ancient Corinth (within shouting distance of this marker); The Rostra (Bema) of the Roman Forum (within shouting distance of this marker); Archaeological Site of Ancient Corinth (within shouting distance of this marker); Saint Paul in Corinth and the Bema of the Roman Forum (within shouting distance of this marker); South Stoa (about 90 meters away, measured in a direct line); Buildings at the West End of Roman Agora (about 90 meters away); Road Network (about 120 meters away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Archea Korinthos (Old Corinth).
 
More about this marker. With regards to the location of all of the markers in the Archaeological Park of Ancient Corinth, when going online and
Lechaion Road Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, June 22, 2015
4. Lechaion Road Marker
Close-up view, that is displayed on the marker, of an illustration, showing the plan of the Lechaion Road.
researching directional information, I could not locate any websites, or any online maps, that provided the names of the local streets, so it was difficult for me to provide accurate and detailed directional information. The street and crossroad that I have provided are the closest two "named" streets that I could locate on any of the maps that I used.

One online site provided the following directions for getting to the archaeological park: "By car: 90 minutes from Athens. The exit to Ancient Corinth, approaching from the north, is about 2 kilometers west of the Tripolis interchange. Warning: visitors familiar with the village before 1996 should take the Patras interchange not the new Tripolis highway to arrive from the other side of the village; no exit was constructed and a U-turn cannot be made for ten kilometers."
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. To better understand the relationship, study each marker in the order shown.
 
Categories. Notable Places
 
Lechaion Road image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, June 22, 2015
5. Lechaion Road
View of the Lechaion Road ruins.
Lechaion Road Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, June 22, 2015
6. Lechaion Road Marker
Close-up view, that is displayed on the marker, of an illustration, showing the plan of the west monuments on the Lechaion Road.
Lechaion Road West Monument Ruins image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, June 22, 2015
7. Lechaion Road West Monument Ruins
View of the west monument ruins on the Lechaion Road.
Lechaion Road Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, June 22, 2015
8. Lechaion Road Marker
Close-up view, that is displayed on the marker, of an illustration, showing the plan of the east monuments on the Lechaion Road.
Lechaion Road East Monument Ruins image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, June 22, 2015
9. Lechaion Road East Monument Ruins
View of the east monument ruins (Peirene Fountain) on the Lechaion Road.
Lechaion Road Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, June 22, 2015
10. Lechaion Road Marker
View of both the road and monument plans, along with the legend keys needed to identify the structures, on the plans illustrations.
Lechaion Road image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, June 23, 2015
11. Lechaion Road
Panoramic view of the Lechaion Road ruins.
Lechaion Road Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, June 22, 2015
12. Lechaion Road Marker
Close-up view, that is displayed on the marker, of an illustration, showing where the park visitor was in relation to the ruins of the archaeological park, while standing in front of the marker.
Lechaion Road Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, June 22, 2015
13. Lechaion Road Marker
View showing where the marker is situated in relation to the Lechaion Road ruins.
Lechaion Road Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, June 22, 2015
14. Lechaion Road Marker
A more distant view showing where the marker is situated in relation to the Lechaion Road ruins ( as noted before, I believe that the marker is situated where the Propylaia would have been).
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on July 4, 2015, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio. This page has been viewed 270 times since then and 37 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14. submitted on July 4, 2015, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.
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