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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Archea Korinthos (Old Corinth) in Corinthia Regional Unit, Peloponnese Region, Greece
 

Archaeological Site of Ancient Corinth

 
 
Archaeological Site of Ancient Corinth Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, June 22, 2015
1. Archaeological Site of Ancient Corinth Marker
Inscription.
Αρχαιολογικός Χώρος Αρχαίας Κορίνθου

English Text:

Legend
1. Temple of Apollo
2. Lechaion Road
3. Propylaia on the Lechaion Road
4. Bema
5. Altar
6. Temple F
7. Temple G
8. Temple H
9. Temple J
10. Monument of Babies Philinus
11. Temple D
12. Temple K
13. Glauke Fountain
14. Temple C
15. Sanctuary of Athena Chalinitis
16. North Market
17. Northwest Shops
18. Odeion
19. Theatre
20. South Stoa
21. West Shops
22. Temple E
23. Museum
24. Captives' Facade
25. North Basilica
26. Semicircular building
27. Fountain of Peirene
28. South Basilica
29. Peribolos of Apollo
30. Baths of Eurykles
31. Temple A
32. Heroon at Stavrodromi
33. Acrocorinth
34. Sanctuary of Demeter and Kore
35. Roman Villa
36. Frankish period
37. Bouleuterion
38. Statue of Poseidon and fountain
39. Julian Basilica
40. Central Shops
41. North cemetery
42. Kenchreai Gate
43. Amphitheatre
44. Agora
45. Asklepieion
46. Isthmian Gate
47.
Archaeological Site of Ancient Corinth Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, June 22, 2015
2. Archaeological Site of Ancient Corinth Marker
Close-up view, that is displayed on the marker, of an illustration, showing the archaeological site at the time of the travel-writer Pausanias during the 2nd century A.C. (click on picture to enlarge)
Phleiasian Gate
48. Potters' Quarter
49. Baths
50. Tile workshop
51. Lechaion
52. Sacred Spring
 
Erected by LZ Ephoreia of Prehistoric & Classical Antiquities.
 
Location. 37° 54.355′ N, 22° 52.78′ E. Marker is in Archea Korinthos (Old Corinth), Peloponnese Region, in Corinthia Regional Unit. Marker is on Enotiki Archeas Korinthou north of EO Korinthou Argous (Local Route 7), on the left when traveling north. Touch for map. This marker is located in the Archaeological Park of Ancient Corinth, and upon first entering the archaeological park, this marker can be found behind the columns of the Temple of Apollo, just off the southeast corner of the Temple of Apollo ruins. Marker is in this post office area: Archea Korinthos (Old Corinth), Peloponnese Region 200 07, Greece.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Lechaion Road (within shouting distance of this marker); Peirene Fountain (within shouting distance of this marker); The Heroon at the Crossroads: an early sanctuary of Ancient Corinth (about 90 meters away, measured in a direct line); The Rostra (Bema) of the Roman Forum (about 90 meters away); Road Network (about
Archaeological Site of Ancient Corinth Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, June 22, 2015
3. Archaeological Site of Ancient Corinth Marker
Close-up view, that is displayed on the marker, of an illustration, showing the city plan of Corinth during the Classical period, in the second half of the 5th century B.C.
90 meters away); Temple of Apollo (about 90 meters away); Buildings at the West End of Roman Agora (about 90 meters away); Saint Paul in Corinth and the Bema of the Roman Forum (about 120 meters away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Archea Korinthos (Old Corinth).
 
More about this marker. With regards to the location of all of the markers in the Archaeological Park of Ancient Corinth, when going online and researching directional information, I could not locate any websites, or any online maps, that provided the names of the local streets, so it was difficult for me to provide accurate and detailed directional information. The street and crossroad that I have provided are the closest two "named" streets that I could locate on any of the maps that I used.

One online site provided the following directions for getting to the archaeological park: "By car: 90 minutes from Athens. The exit to Ancient Corinth, approaching from the north, is about 2 kilometers west of the Tripolis interchange. Warning: visitors familiar with the village before 1996 should take the Patras interchange not the new Tripolis highway to
Archaeological Site of Ancient Corinth Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, June 22, 2015
4. Archaeological Site of Ancient Corinth Marker
Close-up view, that is displayed on the marker, of an illustration, showing the city plan of Corinth during the Hellenistic period, in the first half of the 2nd century B.C.
arrive from the other side of the village; no exit was constructed and a U-turn cannot be made for ten kilometers."

 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. To better understand the relationship, study each marker in the order shown.
 
Categories. Notable Places
 
Archaeological Site of Ancient Corinth Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, June 22, 2015
5. Archaeological Site of Ancient Corinth Marker
Close-up view, that is displayed on the marker, of an illustration, showing the city plan of Corinth during the Roman period, in the 2nd century A.C.
Archaeological Site of Ancient Corinth Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, June 22, 2015
6. Archaeological Site of Ancient Corinth Marker
View showing where the marker is situated in relation to a portion of the archaeological site of Ancient Corinth.
Archaeological Site of Ancient Corinth Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, June 22, 2015
7. Archaeological Site of Ancient Corinth Marker
A more distant view showing where the marker is situated in relation to a portion of the archaeological site of Ancient Corinth.
Archaeological Site of Ancient Corinth Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, June 22, 2015
8. Archaeological Site of Ancient Corinth Marker
Close-up view, that is displayed on the marker, of an illustration, showing where the park visitor was in relation to the Ancient Corinth related ruins of both the archaeological park, and the nearby area.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on July 7, 2015, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio. This page has been viewed 185 times since then and 34 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8. submitted on July 7, 2015, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.
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