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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Vancouver in Clark County, Washington — The American West (Northwest)
 

Officers Row

 
 
Officers Row Marker image. Click for full size.
By Kevin W., June 9, 2008
1. Officers Row Marker
Inscription. When the U.S. Army arrived in 1849 to establish a new post on the western frontier, few of the officers could afford to bring their families out to such a remote and lonely command. A thriving community of soldiers, officers, wives, and children grew as the region gained importance. The early log cabin style quarters on Officers Row were eventually replaced with larger and more elegant residences better suited to the status of their occupants.

From the last decades of the 19th century until World War II, Officers Row was the setting for a vibrant social scene. Isabelle Sparks Kress, reminiscing about her life on the Row as a young woman in the 1870s and 1880s, said that ”the social life here was very fine – the social activities were many, and the great garrison, with over one hundred children and young people, was like one big family.”

By the early 1900s, visitors to the Row extolled the luxurious ambience of the tree-lined boulevard in front of the ”handsome… dwellings, with beautifully kept grounds, all abloom with roses, and with jets of water playing on all the lawns.”
 
Erected by Vancouver National Historic Reserve.
 
Location. 45° 37.719′ N, 122° 39.768′ 
Officers Row and Marker image. Click for full size.
By Kevin W., June 9, 2008
2. Officers Row and Marker
W. Marker is in Vancouver, Washington, in Clark County. Marker is at the intersection of E. Evergreen Way and Fort Vancouver Way, on the left when traveling east on E. Evergreen Way. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Vancouver WA 98661, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Cannon Replica Project (within shouting distance of this marker); Congressional Medal of Honor Monument (within shouting distance of this marker); The Reservation Monument (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); The O. O. Howard House (about 500 feet away); a different marker also named Officers Row (about 700 feet away); Vancouver Barracks Parade Ground (about 700 feet away); The Grant House (about 800 feet away); Clark County Veterans Memorial (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Vancouver.
 
More about this marker. The picture in the upper right is of a Chinese servant who worked for an officer living on Officers Row. It is captioned, "Most officers could afford servants, and many of these were Chinese, Irish, or African American. The man shown here was one of six servants working on the Row in the 1880s. Wives of enlisted soldiers often worked as midwives, cooks, laundresses, and maids as well." It was provide for the marker courtesy of the Clark County Historical Museum,
Closeup of picture from upper right corner of the Officers Row Marker image. Click for full size.
By Kevin W., June 9, 2008
3. Closeup of picture from upper right corner of the Officers Row Marker
#P46-6.

The main picture is of, "The officers and families of the 21st Infantry on Officers Row in 1879, view to the east. Brigadier General O. O. Howard is seated with his youngest son and wife in the front and center." It was provided for the marker courtesy of Norris Perkins II.

Along Officers Row, in front of every house, is at least one marker outlining the history of Fort Vancouver. Their pictures and text are included in the HMdb database on this marker's page, The Grant House Marker page, the Marshall House, and two other markers titled "Officers Row" along E. Evergreen Boulevard. This marker is on the western end of E. Evergreen Boulevard. The ground markers seen on this page extend from this marker to the Grant House and its adjacent "Officers Row" marker.
 
Also see . . .  History of Vancouver, Officers Row. (Submitted on June 25, 2008, by Kevin W. of Stafford, Virginia.)
 
Additional comments.
1. Officers Row Historic District
Officers Row consists of 21 houses located in a long row facing the Fort Vancouver Parade Grounds. The small area, which includes Officers Row, the old Fort Vancouver, and the old Barracks Parade Grounds was once the hub of northwest history.

The houses were designed for either company or field grade officers. High ceilings, large foyers, long
The End of the American Revolution image. Click for full size.
By Kevin W., June 9, 2008
4. The End of the American Revolution
The American Revolution began with the "Shot Heard Around the World" in Concord, Massachusetts. The war ended when the United States and Britain agreed on the U.S./Canadian border in 1847 and the U.S. Army constructed Officer's Roa beginning in 1850. This was the first military post in the Oregon Territory. The command encompassed all of Oregon, Washington, Alaska and much of Idaho. For many years, after the Civil War, it was one of the most prestigious and sought after posts in the country.
Donated by Pacific Die Casting Corporation.
sweeping staircases, bay windows, numerous fireplaces, and many rooms are characteristics of most of the houses. The Grant House, built in 1846, is the oldest house and one of the foremost historical structures in the Old Oregon country.

Listed on the Clark County Heritage Register in 1985.
Listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1974.
    — Submitted June 25, 2008, by Kevin W. of Stafford, Virginia.

 
Categories. ExplorationMilitarySettlements & SettlersWar, US Revolutionary
 
The Oldest Washington Settlement image. Click for full size.
By Kevin W., June 9, 2008
5. The Oldest Washington Settlement
Federal authorities serving the Northwest after 1850 were guided by the Commanding Officer at Vancouver until after the Civil War. Vancouver is the oldest settlement in Washington and was the original Washington Territorial capital. Fort Vancouver was considered by many to be the end of the Oregon Trail.
Donated on behalf of Joseph, Rhonda, Therese, Denise, and Cynthia by their Father Ronald B. Vogel.
First U. S. Citizen Born in Vancouver image. Click for full size.
By Kevin W., June 9, 2008
6. First U. S. Citizen Born in Vancouver
Near here, on December 20, 1853 in one of the original log cabins of the fort, was born Vancouver's first child of U. S. parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Eddings, the postmaster. That cabin was torn down in 1885. The officers at the fort had keenly followed all the events of Napoleon's career and voted to name the baby Josephine after the French General's wife.
Donated by Evergreen Memorial Gardens.
A house along Officers Row image. Click for full size.
By Kevin W., June 9, 2008
7. A house along Officers Row
Rehabilitated in the mid-1980s and considered "21 white elephants nose to tail," Officers Row is now considered one of the city's signature assets.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on June 24, 2008, by Kevin W. of Stafford, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,884 times since then and 152 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on June 24, 2008, by Kevin W. of Stafford, Virginia.   4, 5, 6. submitted on June 29, 2008, by Kevin W. of Stafford, Virginia.   7. submitted on June 25, 2008, by Kevin W. of Stafford, Virginia.
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