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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Stirling in Stirlingshire, Scotland, United Kingdom
 

Battle of Bannockburn

 
 
Battle of Bannockburn Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, April 2, 2011
1. Battle of Bannockburn Marker
Inscription.
"For God and St. Andrew"
Robert the Bruce
King of Scots
Planted his standard
near this spot
when the
Scottish Patriots
under the command
vanquished the Army of
Edward II of England at
the Battle of
Bannockburn
24th June 1314

"We fight not for glory nor for wealth nor honour but only and alone we fight for freedom which no good man surrenders but with his life"
 
Erected by National Trust for Scotland.
 
Location. 56° 5.604′ N, 3° 56.279′ W. Marker is in Stirling, Scotland, in Stirlingshire. Marker is on Glasgow Road. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: Glasgow Road, Stirling, Scotland FK7 0PL, United Kingdom.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 13 kilometers of this marker, measured as the crow flies. The Battle of Stirling Bridge (approx. 3.9 kilometers away); National Wallace Monument (approx. 5.2 kilometers away); Antonine Wall Rough Castle (approx. 11.6 kilometers away); The Northern Defences (approx. 11.7 kilometers away); The Antonine Wall (approx. 11.7 kilometers away);
Battle of Bannockburn Marker - Main Plaque image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, April 2, 2011
2. Battle of Bannockburn Marker - Main Plaque
a different marker also named The Antonine Wall (approx. 11.7 kilometers away); The Roman Fort (approx. 11.8 kilometers away); a different marker also named Antonine Wall (approx. 11.8 kilometers away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Stirling.
 
Also see . . .  The Battle of Bannockburn, 1314. The BBC provides a brief history of the Battle of Bannockburn and its aftermath: .The battle was over. English casualties were heavy: thousands of infantry, a 100 knights and one earl lay dead on the field. Some escaped the confusion: the Earl of Pembroke and his Welsh infantry made it safely to Carlisle, but many more, including many knights and the Earl of Hereford, were captured as they fled through the south of Scotland. Edward II with 500 knights was pursued by Sir James "the Black" Douglas until they reached Dunbar and the safety of a ship home. The capture of Edward would have meant instant English recognition of the Scots demands. As it was, they could absorb such a defeat and continue the war. For the Scots it was a resounding victory. Bruce was left in total military control of Scotland, enabling him to transfer his campaign to the north of England. Politically he had won Scotland's defacto independence and consolidated his kingship –
Robert the Bruce Monument image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, April 2, 2011
3. Robert the Bruce Monument
Robert the Bruce Monument with Stirling Castle in the distance to the right
as former supporters of Balliol quickly changed sides. In exchange for Bruce's noble captives Edward was forced to release Bruce's wife, daughter and the formidable Bishop Wishart, who had been held in English captivity since 1306. For the Scots soldiers there was the wealth of booty left in the English baggage train and the exhilaration of victory.
(Submitted on July 19, 2015.) 
 
Categories. Notable Places
 
Robert the Bruce Monument image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, April 2, 2011
4. Robert the Bruce Monument
Robert the Bruce Monument image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, April 2, 2011
5. Robert the Bruce Monument
Robert the Bruce Monument image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, May 29, 2015
6. Robert the Bruce Monument
Bruce Monument was refurbished in 2014 for the 700th Anniversary of the Battle of Bannockburn.
Robert the Bruce Monument image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, May 29, 2015
7. Robert the Bruce Monument
Plaque on the back of the Robert Bruce Monument describing the unveiling by Queen Elizabeth on the 650th Anniversary of the battle on 24th of June 1964
Old Bannockburn Heritage Center image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, April 2, 2011
8. Old Bannockburn Heritage Center
The old Bannockburn Heritage Center
New Bannockburn Heritage Center image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, May 29, 2015
9. New Bannockburn Heritage Center
The new Bannockburn Heritage Center dedicated on the 700th Anniversary of the Battle of Bannockburn
New Battle of Bannockburn Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, May 29, 2015
10. New Battle of Bannockburn Marker
Located behind the new Bannockburn Heritage Center, this marker was added for the 700th Anniversary of the battle in 2014.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on July 17, 2015, by Brandon Fletcher of Chattanooga, Tennessee. This page has been viewed 239 times since then and 54 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10. submitted on July 17, 2015, by Brandon Fletcher of Chattanooga, Tennessee. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
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